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Louise’s guidebook

Louise

Louise’s guidebook

Food scene
A great place to have a cold beer and chat with the locals. Has a kids room and serves good basic affordable meals on Friday and Saturday evenings
Come meet the locals and have a cold beer. Every Friday and Saturday evening food is served or you can order take away.
Mundoora Community Sports Club
LOT 4 East Terrace
Come meet the locals and have a cold beer. Every Friday and Saturday evening food is served or you can order take away.
Neighbourhoods
IGA - Food Supplies Baker Bears Bakery Pt Broughton Bakery Chemist Port Broughton is a small South Australian town located at the northern extent of the Yorke Peninsula on the east coast of Spencer Gulf. It is situated about 170 km north west of Adelaide, and 56 km south of Port Pirie In the 2016 Census, there were 1,225 people in Port Broughton (State Suburbs). Of these 48.2% were male and 51.8% were female. Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people made up 1.6% of the population.. The close proximity (two hours drive from Adelaide) makes it a popular tourist destination, with the number of people in town swelling to over 4000 in the summer holidays
Port Broughton
IGA - Food Supplies Baker Bears Bakery Pt Broughton Bakery Chemist Port Broughton is a small South Australian town located at the northern extent of the Yorke Peninsula on the east coast of Spencer Gulf. It is situated about 170 km north west of Adelaide, and 56 km south of Port Pirie In the 2016 Census, there were 1,225 people in Port Broughton (State Suburbs). Of these 48.2% were male and 51.8% were female. Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people made up 1.6% of the population.. The close proximity (two hours drive from Adelaide) makes it a popular tourist destination, with the number of people in town swelling to over 4000 in the summer holidays
Sightseeing
The Pink Lake definitely worth a visit.
Lochiel
The Pink Lake definitely worth a visit.
A gorgeous town with lots of history great shopping antique shops and collectables and plenty of places to eat. A popular holiday town where the sandy coves, stunning beaches, jetty and clear blue waters complete the idyllic panorama of Moonta Bay. Located on the shores of Spencer Gulf, Moonta Bay is just 168 kilometres from Adelaide. Its beaches and jetty make this township a real draw card for families, holiday makers and fishermen alike. Moonta and Port Hughes are close neighbours of Moonta Bay. The Port Hughes jetty offers excellent fishing opportunities. The area is very popular with boat fishers and charter boats with the boat ramp being the second business in the state. Things to do: Moonta Bay Jetty Splash Town Water Park Walk The Yorke Port Hughes Jetty There is an excellent range of accommodation available, from the foreshore caravan park to motel and self-contained holiday homes. There are also great restaurants and cafes making it one of the best places to view the sun setting.
Moonta Bay
A gorgeous town with lots of history great shopping antique shops and collectables and plenty of places to eat. A popular holiday town where the sandy coves, stunning beaches, jetty and clear blue waters complete the idyllic panorama of Moonta Bay. Located on the shores of Spencer Gulf, Moonta Bay is just 168 kilometres from Adelaide. Its beaches and jetty make this township a real draw card for families, holiday makers and fishermen alike. Moonta and Port Hughes are close neighbours of Moonta Bay. The Port Hughes jetty offers excellent fishing opportunities. The area is very popular with boat fishers and charter boats with the boat ramp being the second business in the state. Things to do: Moonta Bay Jetty Splash Town Water Park Walk The Yorke Port Hughes Jetty There is an excellent range of accommodation available, from the foreshore caravan park to motel and self-contained holiday homes. There are also great restaurants and cafes making it one of the best places to view the sun setting.
The appeal of the Yorke Peninsula lies in its quiet beaches, its excellent fishing and swimming, and the opportunities it offers to explore the rich history of copper mining at Moonta, Wallaroo and Kadina. In this sense Kadina, because it is the largest town on the peninsula and because it functions as the service centre for the region, is something of a Cinderella being left behind Marion Bay and Wallaroo (for example) which have much more appeal. Still Kadina is interesting for those who want to explore the rich copper mining history of the area and for those who want to visit the finest banking and currency museum in the country. Discovering Historic Kadina Town Walk and Drive The best way to see Kadina's large number of historic buildings is to visit the Copper Coast Visitor Information Centre, pick up a Discovering Historic Kadina Town Walk brochure (for a nominal charge), head to the Kadina Town Hall (which is the starting point) and then mooch around the well signposted historical sites including the Kadina Railway Station (1878); the Victoria Square Rotunda, the Town Hall with its its impressive clock tower donated by Daniel Squibb, a local blacksmith; the Banking and Currency Museum (1874); the Church of Christ (1920); the stone residences in Lipson Avenue (c.1900); the Pioneer Cemetery (c.1860); the Wallaroo Mine (1860) and the former Police Residence (c.1900). Perhaps the most interesting building in town is the Royal Exchange Hotel (1861) with its elegant cast iron balcony - at one time the longest balcony in South Australia - on the upstairs veranda and its National Trust listing. In 1875 it changed its name from the Exchange Hotel to the Royal Exchange Hotel after a stay by the Duke of Clarence, one of the many contenders for the mysterious identity of Jack the Ripper. It was also visited by a group of travelling cricketers led by the famous W. G. Grace in 1874. For more details check out http://www.southaustralia.com/info.aspx?id=9009704. There is also the Discovering Historic Kadina Town Drive which drives for 12 km around the local area and focuses on the importance of copper to the local economy. Wallaroo Mine Kadina's first mine was named Wallaroo after the property of its owner Walter Watson Hughes. Today the Wallaroo Mine is located 1.5 km south-west of the town centre (take the Moonta Road south and turn west into Matta Road) and is easily identified because of the large stone ruins of Harvey's Enginehouse (erected 1876). There was always a problem with groundwater at the Wallaroo Mine and the Enginehouse ran 24 hours a day pumping the water out so the copper could be extracted. Around it, and clearly signposted, are the remnants and ruins of the Wallaroo Mine. The mine has a fascinating history. In February, 1860 Walter Watson Hughes employed four miners who were working at the copper mine in Burra. By the middle of the year 150 miners were working at Wallaroo and by 1875 it was employing 1,000 men. The Farm Shed Museum Not only is it huge but it seems to keep growing. The Farm Shed Museum, as its name suggests, is a series of very substantial sheds which make up an excellent museum, now run by the National Trust, which successfully attempts to record the history of farming and mining on the Yorke Peninsula. Located 1.5 km south of the town centre the centrepiece is Matta House - a beautifully kept and maintained mine manager's house built in 1863 which has a shingle roof, a well kept cottage garden and is furnished with Victoriana. It is an excellent insight into the lifestyle of an important member (Edward Austin Horn, the manager of Matta Mine) of Kadina's mining community in the 19th century. There is an extensive collection of farming machinery, particularly dryland farming equipment; a 1950s schoolroom which has been carefully re-created; an excellent printing museum; an old style telephone exchange; a separate section devoted to the role of women in the local farming community; and a photographic collection recording the mining history of the town and the surrounding area. The complex at 50 Moonta Road is open from 9.00 am - 5.00 pm Monday to Friday and 10.00 am - 4.00 pm Saturday and Sunday. For further information contact either (08) 8821 2333 and check out http://farmshed.net.au Miniature Railway Located at the Farm Shed Museum is a miniature railway run by the well-named Copper Coast Old Engineering and Machinery Club. It runs on the first and third Sundays of each month. For more details check out http://farmshed.net.au/miniaturerailway/ Kernewek Lowender Kernewek Lowender means Cornish Happiness in the original language of Cornwall. The first festival was held in 1973 and since then it has been held every odd numbered year, has grown so it is now celebrated in the three Copper Triangle towns (Kadina, Wallaroo and Moonta) and attracts more than 30,000 people to the region. It is promoted by the Yorke Peninsula Tourism as 'the world's largest Cornish Festival' and held in May. The program includes dances (the Furry Dance is a particular highlight - it is a pre-Christian Cornish dance), craft displays, Cornish folk singers, a Cornish feast, religious celebrations, Cornish language lessons, pasty making competitions and a myriad of other activities. As it is a biennial event it is necessary to check when the next festival is on. Check out http://www.kernewek.org/
Kadina
The appeal of the Yorke Peninsula lies in its quiet beaches, its excellent fishing and swimming, and the opportunities it offers to explore the rich history of copper mining at Moonta, Wallaroo and Kadina. In this sense Kadina, because it is the largest town on the peninsula and because it functions as the service centre for the region, is something of a Cinderella being left behind Marion Bay and Wallaroo (for example) which have much more appeal. Still Kadina is interesting for those who want to explore the rich copper mining history of the area and for those who want to visit the finest banking and currency museum in the country. Discovering Historic Kadina Town Walk and Drive The best way to see Kadina's large number of historic buildings is to visit the Copper Coast Visitor Information Centre, pick up a Discovering Historic Kadina Town Walk brochure (for a nominal charge), head to the Kadina Town Hall (which is the starting point) and then mooch around the well signposted historical sites including the Kadina Railway Station (1878); the Victoria Square Rotunda, the Town Hall with its its impressive clock tower donated by Daniel Squibb, a local blacksmith; the Banking and Currency Museum (1874); the Church of Christ (1920); the stone residences in Lipson Avenue (c.1900); the Pioneer Cemetery (c.1860); the Wallaroo Mine (1860) and the former Police Residence (c.1900). Perhaps the most interesting building in town is the Royal Exchange Hotel (1861) with its elegant cast iron balcony - at one time the longest balcony in South Australia - on the upstairs veranda and its National Trust listing. In 1875 it changed its name from the Exchange Hotel to the Royal Exchange Hotel after a stay by the Duke of Clarence, one of the many contenders for the mysterious identity of Jack the Ripper. It was also visited by a group of travelling cricketers led by the famous W. G. Grace in 1874. For more details check out http://www.southaustralia.com/info.aspx?id=9009704. There is also the Discovering Historic Kadina Town Drive which drives for 12 km around the local area and focuses on the importance of copper to the local economy. Wallaroo Mine Kadina's first mine was named Wallaroo after the property of its owner Walter Watson Hughes. Today the Wallaroo Mine is located 1.5 km south-west of the town centre (take the Moonta Road south and turn west into Matta Road) and is easily identified because of the large stone ruins of Harvey's Enginehouse (erected 1876). There was always a problem with groundwater at the Wallaroo Mine and the Enginehouse ran 24 hours a day pumping the water out so the copper could be extracted. Around it, and clearly signposted, are the remnants and ruins of the Wallaroo Mine. The mine has a fascinating history. In February, 1860 Walter Watson Hughes employed four miners who were working at the copper mine in Burra. By the middle of the year 150 miners were working at Wallaroo and by 1875 it was employing 1,000 men. The Farm Shed Museum Not only is it huge but it seems to keep growing. The Farm Shed Museum, as its name suggests, is a series of very substantial sheds which make up an excellent museum, now run by the National Trust, which successfully attempts to record the history of farming and mining on the Yorke Peninsula. Located 1.5 km south of the town centre the centrepiece is Matta House - a beautifully kept and maintained mine manager's house built in 1863 which has a shingle roof, a well kept cottage garden and is furnished with Victoriana. It is an excellent insight into the lifestyle of an important member (Edward Austin Horn, the manager of Matta Mine) of Kadina's mining community in the 19th century. There is an extensive collection of farming machinery, particularly dryland farming equipment; a 1950s schoolroom which has been carefully re-created; an excellent printing museum; an old style telephone exchange; a separate section devoted to the role of women in the local farming community; and a photographic collection recording the mining history of the town and the surrounding area. The complex at 50 Moonta Road is open from 9.00 am - 5.00 pm Monday to Friday and 10.00 am - 4.00 pm Saturday and Sunday. For further information contact either (08) 8821 2333 and check out http://farmshed.net.au Miniature Railway Located at the Farm Shed Museum is a miniature railway run by the well-named Copper Coast Old Engineering and Machinery Club. It runs on the first and third Sundays of each month. For more details check out http://farmshed.net.au/miniaturerailway/ Kernewek Lowender Kernewek Lowender means Cornish Happiness in the original language of Cornwall. The first festival was held in 1973 and since then it has been held every odd numbered year, has grown so it is now celebrated in the three Copper Triangle towns (Kadina, Wallaroo and Moonta) and attracts more than 30,000 people to the region. It is promoted by the Yorke Peninsula Tourism as 'the world's largest Cornish Festival' and held in May. The program includes dances (the Furry Dance is a particular highlight - it is a pre-Christian Cornish dance), craft displays, Cornish folk singers, a Cornish feast, religious celebrations, Cornish language lessons, pasty making competitions and a myriad of other activities. As it is a biennial event it is necessary to check when the next festival is on. Check out http://www.kernewek.org/
Wallaroo is a very popular holiday town just 160 kilometres north of Adelaide, offering great swimming, fishing, relaxing and sightseeing. The Wallaroo jetty is one of the most popular in the state for fishers whilst under the jetty is popular for divers with a variety of sea life. A deep sea port and home to the Spencer Gulf prawn fleet, complete with a multi-million dollar marina development Wallaroo has an abundance of attractions and is the home port of the Sea SA Car and Passenger Ferry. The long, wide northern beaches are so welcoming that many never want to leave. Wallaroo is a town that has experienced the good times and can look forward to many more. The old waterfront still echoes the era when the docks teemed with men and the triangle mined, smelted and delivered copper and other metals to the world. Things to do: A visit to the Wallaroo Heritage and Nautical Museum will help you relive the fascinating history of these amazing times. Wallaroo Marina. Wallaroo Foreshore. Great swimming, fishing and boating. Wallaroo playground Wallaroo Golf Club. Explore the Wallaroo Town Walking Trail to learn about the area and history. Pick up a brochure from the visitor information centre. Wallaroo was first surveyed in late 1860 and named after Walter Watson Hughes' Wallaroo Station, located east of the smelting works site. The smelting area was set up in 1861 following the discovery of copper ore at nearby Wallaroo Mine (Kadina) and Moonta. The first jetty was constructed in 1861 as part of the contract to build a tramway to the Wallaroo Mine. It soon became one of the busiest ports in the state and continues that role today with the export of grain.
Wallaroo
Wallaroo is a very popular holiday town just 160 kilometres north of Adelaide, offering great swimming, fishing, relaxing and sightseeing. The Wallaroo jetty is one of the most popular in the state for fishers whilst under the jetty is popular for divers with a variety of sea life. A deep sea port and home to the Spencer Gulf prawn fleet, complete with a multi-million dollar marina development Wallaroo has an abundance of attractions and is the home port of the Sea SA Car and Passenger Ferry. The long, wide northern beaches are so welcoming that many never want to leave. Wallaroo is a town that has experienced the good times and can look forward to many more. The old waterfront still echoes the era when the docks teemed with men and the triangle mined, smelted and delivered copper and other metals to the world. Things to do: A visit to the Wallaroo Heritage and Nautical Museum will help you relive the fascinating history of these amazing times. Wallaroo Marina. Wallaroo Foreshore. Great swimming, fishing and boating. Wallaroo playground Wallaroo Golf Club. Explore the Wallaroo Town Walking Trail to learn about the area and history. Pick up a brochure from the visitor information centre. Wallaroo was first surveyed in late 1860 and named after Walter Watson Hughes' Wallaroo Station, located east of the smelting works site. The smelting area was set up in 1861 following the discovery of copper ore at nearby Wallaroo Mine (Kadina) and Moonta. The first jetty was constructed in 1861 as part of the contract to build a tramway to the Wallaroo Mine. It soon became one of the busiest ports in the state and continues that role today with the export of grain.
All you need is in Pt Pirie. A larger town with lots to do and see. Port Pirie is a city and seaport on the east coast of the Spencer Gulf in South Australia, 223 km (139 mi) north of the state capital, Adelaide. The settlement was founded in 1845 and at June 2018 had an estimated urban population of 14,188.
Port Pirie South
All you need is in Pt Pirie. A larger town with lots to do and see. Port Pirie is a city and seaport on the east coast of the Spencer Gulf in South Australia, 223 km (139 mi) north of the state capital, Adelaide. The settlement was founded in 1845 and at June 2018 had an estimated urban population of 14,188.