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Pineapple Holiday Homes’s guidebook to the North Norfolk Coast

Pineapple Holiday Homes
Pineapple Holiday Homes
Membro desde 2019
Pineapple Holiday Homes

Pineapple Holiday Homes’s guidebook to the North Norfolk Coast

A selection of fine villages on the North Norfolk Coast
We have compiled a list of a few places to visit during your stay, we hope you enjoy the beautiful North Norfolk Coast.
Heacham is a large village located on the West Norfolk coast and home to two sandy beaches originally called North and South beach. Heacham has historic ties to Pocahontas who married John Rolfe, a native of this village on 5 April 1614 at a church in Jamestown, Virginia! The Church of St Mary the Virgin is the oldest surviving building in the village. It dates from 1230 and is Norman in style. In the cupola on the tower hangs a bell dating from about 1100, making it the oldest in East Anglia, and the seventh oldest in the country. The beaches at Heacham are on the east banks of The Wash. They are among the few beaches in eastern England where the sun sets over the sea instead of over the land. A perfect spot for a romantic glass of wine! There is a wide selection of shops and pubs and the delightful Heacham Manor Hotel with its 18 hole golf course. Also in Heacham is Caley Mill which is an early 19th-century water mill and now the site of Norfolk Lavender which has all the known varieties of lavender and is open to the public. For the smaller people in your party, take a trip to Farmer Fred's Adventure Play Barn with its 3D farm themed adventure fun!! The village has three pubs, The West Norfolk, The Fox & Hounds and The Bushel & Strike.
Heacham
Heacham is a large village located on the West Norfolk coast and home to two sandy beaches originally called North and South beach. Heacham has historic ties to Pocahontas who married John Rolfe, a native of this village on 5 April 1614 at a church in Jamestown, Virginia! The Church of St Mary the Virgin is the oldest surviving building in the village. It dates from 1230 and is Norman in style. In the cupola on the tower hangs a bell dating from about 1100, making it the oldest in East Anglia, and the seventh oldest in the country. The beaches at Heacham are on the east banks of The Wash. They are among the few beaches in eastern England where the sun sets over the sea instead of over the land. A perfect spot for a romantic glass of wine! There is a wide selection of shops and pubs and the delightful Heacham Manor Hotel with its 18 hole golf course. Also in Heacham is Caley Mill which is an early 19th-century water mill and now the site of Norfolk Lavender which has all the known varieties of lavender and is open to the public. For the smaller people in your party, take a trip to Farmer Fred's Adventure Play Barn with its 3D farm themed adventure fun!! The village has three pubs, The West Norfolk, The Fox & Hounds and The Bushel & Strike.
This pretty village is located within the North Norfolk Heritage Coast and is renowned for being the northern end of the 50 mile long Roman Peddars Way that starts near Thetford. At Holme the Peddars Way path meets with the Norfolk Coastal Path which goes all the way along the coast to Cromer. Holme is also famous for being the site of Sea Henge, a 4,500 thousand year old Bronze Age tree circle discovered on the beach. There is a fabulous stretch of open sandy beach backed by sand dunes and the Nature Reserve where there are a number of hides and many different varieties of birds have been spotted. There is a good local pub, The White Horse, serving good local food and ales. Hunstanton golf course, a renowned links course, runs into Holme and there are riding stables nearby too.
Holme-next-the-Sea
This pretty village is located within the North Norfolk Heritage Coast and is renowned for being the northern end of the 50 mile long Roman Peddars Way that starts near Thetford. At Holme the Peddars Way path meets with the Norfolk Coastal Path which goes all the way along the coast to Cromer. Holme is also famous for being the site of Sea Henge, a 4,500 thousand year old Bronze Age tree circle discovered on the beach. There is a fabulous stretch of open sandy beach backed by sand dunes and the Nature Reserve where there are a number of hides and many different varieties of birds have been spotted. There is a good local pub, The White Horse, serving good local food and ales. Hunstanton golf course, a renowned links course, runs into Holme and there are riding stables nearby too.
Hunstanton is a coastal town and resort facing the Blue Flag beaches of the Wash. You can watch the sunset over the sea as it is the only town on the east coast that faces west. The beaches are long and sandy and the town is famous for its magnificent striped cliffs. There are two supermarkets and a good range of shops and places to eat. For the golfers there is the superb championship course of Hunstanton golf club. The Royal Sandringham Estate is only a short distance away with its famous house and gardens.
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Hunstanton
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Hunstanton is a coastal town and resort facing the Blue Flag beaches of the Wash. You can watch the sunset over the sea as it is the only town on the east coast that faces west. The beaches are long and sandy and the town is famous for its magnificent striped cliffs. There are two supermarkets and a good range of shops and places to eat. For the golfers there is the superb championship course of Hunstanton golf club. The Royal Sandringham Estate is only a short distance away with its famous house and gardens.
Old Hunstanton was originally a fishing village which dates back to AD 855 when St. Edmund was shipwrecked here. Now it is a sought after coastal holiday village which is only a mile from the livelier seaside resort of Hunstanton. There is a huge sandy beach and cliffs at Old Hunstanton which makes it popular with families, dog walkers and kite-surfers throughout the year. It is also home to the highly regarded Hunstanton championship golf course which is situated behind the dunes to the east of the village. There is a good choice of local places to eat and drink with The Lodge hotel and bar, Le Strange Arms, the Michelin starred Neptune restaurant and an excellent village shop/deli. The bustling seaside town of Hunstanton is close by with its wider range of shops, Sealife Centre, funfair, amusements, bowling, swimming pool, theatre and crazy golf.
Old Hunstanton
Old Hunstanton was originally a fishing village which dates back to AD 855 when St. Edmund was shipwrecked here. Now it is a sought after coastal holiday village which is only a mile from the livelier seaside resort of Hunstanton. There is a huge sandy beach and cliffs at Old Hunstanton which makes it popular with families, dog walkers and kite-surfers throughout the year. It is also home to the highly regarded Hunstanton championship golf course which is situated behind the dunes to the east of the village. There is a good choice of local places to eat and drink with The Lodge hotel and bar, Le Strange Arms, the Michelin starred Neptune restaurant and an excellent village shop/deli. The bustling seaside town of Hunstanton is close by with its wider range of shops, Sealife Centre, funfair, amusements, bowling, swimming pool, theatre and crazy golf.
An attractive village approximately 2 miles inland from Holme with pink and white-washed cottages built in traditional Norfolk carstone. A rare Norman round tower, all that survives of St. Peter's church, stands in the grounds of the former rectory. A good village for walkers with access onto the Peddars Way, the Courtyard Farm walks and also the lovely Ringstead Downs nature reserve. Ringstead has an excellent village shop stocking a wide range of products and there is an excellent 17th original coaching inn, The Gin Trap, which serves delicious food and great wines and beers, as well as a fantastic selection of different gins!
Ringstead
An attractive village approximately 2 miles inland from Holme with pink and white-washed cottages built in traditional Norfolk carstone. A rare Norman round tower, all that survives of St. Peter's church, stands in the grounds of the former rectory. A good village for walkers with access onto the Peddars Way, the Courtyard Farm walks and also the lovely Ringstead Downs nature reserve. Ringstead has an excellent village shop stocking a wide range of products and there is an excellent 17th original coaching inn, The Gin Trap, which serves delicious food and great wines and beers, as well as a fantastic selection of different gins!
Sandringham is the much-loved country retreat of Her Majesty The Queen, and has been the private home of four generations of British monarchs since 1862. The house, set in 24 hectares of stunning gardens, is perhaps the most famous stately home in Norfolk and is at the heart of the 8,000-hectare Sandringham Estate, 240 hectares of which make up the woodland and heath of the Country Park, open to the public free of charge every day of the year. 2018 opening dates: Sandringham House, Gardens and Museum, and Sandringham Church, are open daily from Saturday 31st March until Sunday 21st October 2018, EXCEPT 23rd to 27th July inclusive. Sandringham is a friendly and informal place to visit, with knowledgeable guides in every room of the house and acres of beautiful gardens to explore while the Museum houses extraordinary collections of Royal vehicles, rare ceramics, photographs and memorabilia. There is plenty to see and do around the estate as well - you'll need at least four hours to be sure you can see everything, and if you have a whole day to spend, all the better. Don't miss the parish church of St Mary Magdalene with its hosts of carved and painted angels and its many Royal memorials; the tractor and trailer tour of the Country Park saves tired legs, and of course the Restaurant or Stables Tea Room can offer reviving hot or cold drinks, snacks and meals before you investigate the various Visitor Centre shops. The parish church of St Mary Magdalene, Sandringham, is a country church of exceptional historic interest, with memorials to many members and relations of the Royal Family from Queen Victoria onwards. It is used regularly as a place of worship by the Royal Family and Estate staff. Sandringham Church is considered to be one of the finest carrstone buildings in existence, and dates back in its present form to the 16th century. The sumptuously decorated chancel with its carved angels frames the silver altar and reredos presented to Queen Alexandra by the American Rodman Wanamaker as a tribute to King Edward VII. He also presented her with the silver pulpit and a silver 17th-century Spanish processional cross. Other notable features include a Florentine marble font, a Greek 9th-century font and stained glass from the 16th century onwards. The church is open daily from 30th March to 26th July and then from 31st July to 3rd November. Opening times are from 11.00am to 5.00pm (4.00pm in October), Sundays 1.00pm to 5.00pm (4.00pm in October), unless there are additional services taking place. During the winter it is open only for services.
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Sandringham House
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Sandringham is the much-loved country retreat of Her Majesty The Queen, and has been the private home of four generations of British monarchs since 1862. The house, set in 24 hectares of stunning gardens, is perhaps the most famous stately home in Norfolk and is at the heart of the 8,000-hectare Sandringham Estate, 240 hectares of which make up the woodland and heath of the Country Park, open to the public free of charge every day of the year. 2018 opening dates: Sandringham House, Gardens and Museum, and Sandringham Church, are open daily from Saturday 31st March until Sunday 21st October 2018, EXCEPT 23rd to 27th July inclusive. Sandringham is a friendly and informal place to visit, with knowledgeable guides in every room of the house and acres of beautiful gardens to explore while the Museum houses extraordinary collections of Royal vehicles, rare ceramics, photographs and memorabilia. There is plenty to see and do around the estate as well - you'll need at least four hours to be sure you can see everything, and if you have a whole day to spend, all the better. Don't miss the parish church of St Mary Magdalene with its hosts of carved and painted angels and its many Royal memorials; the tractor and trailer tour of the Country Park saves tired legs, and of course the Restaurant or Stables Tea Room can offer reviving hot or cold drinks, snacks and meals before you investigate the various Visitor Centre shops. The parish church of St Mary Magdalene, Sandringham, is a country church of exceptional historic interest, with memorials to many members and relations of the Royal Family from Queen Victoria onwards. It is used regularly as a place of worship by the Royal Family and Estate staff. Sandringham Church is considered to be one of the finest carrstone buildings in existence, and dates back in its present form to the 16th century. The sumptuously decorated chancel with its carved angels frames the silver altar and reredos presented to Queen Alexandra by the American Rodman Wanamaker as a tribute to King Edward VII. He also presented her with the silver pulpit and a silver 17th-century Spanish processional cross. Other notable features include a Florentine marble font, a Greek 9th-century font and stained glass from the 16th century onwards. The church is open daily from 30th March to 26th July and then from 31st July to 3rd November. Opening times are from 11.00am to 5.00pm (4.00pm in October), Sundays 1.00pm to 5.00pm (4.00pm in October), unless there are additional services taking place. During the winter it is open only for services.
At the western end of the North Norfolk coast, Thornham is situated on the scenic A149 coastal road, roughly half-way between Hunstanton and the Burnhams. This is a village of fewer than 500 inhabitants, however it is now one of the most popular coastal villages in the area with its excellent selection of places to eat, the unspoilt coastline and nearby RSPB reserve at Titchwell. There is a beautiful unspoilt beach for those willing to hike the mile or so out along the coastal path, but the characteristic landscape here is one of marshes and salt water inlets. Thornham had a prosperous harbour 200 years ago (particularly for smugglers it seems), and still has a small boat harbour today, as well as rugged Thornham Creek, which is a popular spot for artists and photographers. Down by the marshes The Lifeboat Inn, built in the 16th century, provides excellent food and drink throughout the day. In the centre of the village, locally caught seafood is served at the award winning Orange Tree gastro pub, opposite All Saints church which is an impressive building with 15th century foundations. Thornham has a third good place to eat - The Chequers Inn which serves delicious home-cooked pizzas and is ideal for families. Thornham has a great range of local amenities with the excellent Thornham deli, shop and cafe, a childrens' playground and a tennis court. Just along the coast road heading towards Hunstanton is Drove Orchards which opens seasonally for the sale of a wide range of locally sourced fresh foods from its award-winning farm shop, has an amazingly wide variety of pick-your-own fruits, fishmonger, lifestyle shopping, plant nursery and play area.. One of Norfolk's best places for fish and chips is Eric's Fish & Chips (behind Drove Orchards) which is owned and run by a chef formerly at Titchwell Manor. It offers delicious freshly cooked fish and chips to eat in or takeaway.
Thornham
At the western end of the North Norfolk coast, Thornham is situated on the scenic A149 coastal road, roughly half-way between Hunstanton and the Burnhams. This is a village of fewer than 500 inhabitants, however it is now one of the most popular coastal villages in the area with its excellent selection of places to eat, the unspoilt coastline and nearby RSPB reserve at Titchwell. There is a beautiful unspoilt beach for those willing to hike the mile or so out along the coastal path, but the characteristic landscape here is one of marshes and salt water inlets. Thornham had a prosperous harbour 200 years ago (particularly for smugglers it seems), and still has a small boat harbour today, as well as rugged Thornham Creek, which is a popular spot for artists and photographers. Down by the marshes The Lifeboat Inn, built in the 16th century, provides excellent food and drink throughout the day. In the centre of the village, locally caught seafood is served at the award winning Orange Tree gastro pub, opposite All Saints church which is an impressive building with 15th century foundations. Thornham has a third good place to eat - The Chequers Inn which serves delicious home-cooked pizzas and is ideal for families. Thornham has a great range of local amenities with the excellent Thornham deli, shop and cafe, a childrens' playground and a tennis court. Just along the coast road heading towards Hunstanton is Drove Orchards which opens seasonally for the sale of a wide range of locally sourced fresh foods from its award-winning farm shop, has an amazingly wide variety of pick-your-own fruits, fishmonger, lifestyle shopping, plant nursery and play area.. One of Norfolk's best places for fish and chips is Eric's Fish & Chips (behind Drove Orchards) which is owned and run by a chef formerly at Titchwell Manor. It offers delicious freshly cooked fish and chips to eat in or takeaway.
Brancaster is renowned for its wide expanse of sandy beach and has the advantage of being one of the few places along this stretch of the North Norfolk coastline that you can park the car less than 50m from the beach. This makes it a popular choice for families and as one of the driest parts of the UK it makes it an excellent choice for a traditional English seaside holiday. Throughout the year the beach is used by dog walkers, kite-surfers and bird-watchers, and in warmer climes by paddlers, swimmers and basking seals. For those needing more intellectual stimulus, at very low tides the remains of a petrified forest can be seen here. Brancaster was the site of the Roman fort of Branodonum, built to guard against raids by Frankish and Saxon pirates, although some local legends claim it was to counter Druids living nearby. All that is left of the fort now are a few ditches to the east of the village, and some Roman bricks in various cottages and outhouses. More recent history may be seen in St Mary's church, a Saxon building with a characteristic round tower nearly a thousand years old. The church has some beautiful medieval stained glass, and a fifteenth century bell cast in Kings Lynn. For the more energetic the National Trust runs Brancaster's Activity Centre, offering sailing, orienteering and kayaking for children and parents, and just outside there is the Royal North West Norfolk Golf Club which is one of the best courses in the area. The local pub The Ship has an excellent reputation as an award winning quality restaurant.
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Brancaster
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Brancaster is renowned for its wide expanse of sandy beach and has the advantage of being one of the few places along this stretch of the North Norfolk coastline that you can park the car less than 50m from the beach. This makes it a popular choice for families and as one of the driest parts of the UK it makes it an excellent choice for a traditional English seaside holiday. Throughout the year the beach is used by dog walkers, kite-surfers and bird-watchers, and in warmer climes by paddlers, swimmers and basking seals. For those needing more intellectual stimulus, at very low tides the remains of a petrified forest can be seen here. Brancaster was the site of the Roman fort of Branodonum, built to guard against raids by Frankish and Saxon pirates, although some local legends claim it was to counter Druids living nearby. All that is left of the fort now are a few ditches to the east of the village, and some Roman bricks in various cottages and outhouses. More recent history may be seen in St Mary's church, a Saxon building with a characteristic round tower nearly a thousand years old. The church has some beautiful medieval stained glass, and a fifteenth century bell cast in Kings Lynn. For the more energetic the National Trust runs Brancaster's Activity Centre, offering sailing, orienteering and kayaking for children and parents, and just outside there is the Royal North West Norfolk Golf Club which is one of the best courses in the area. The local pub The Ship has an excellent reputation as an award winning quality restaurant.
A bustling village with an attractive harbour which is just to the east of Brancaster (staithe means wharf, or landing stage). There is a well-supported sailing club here and in the summer at high tide there is always a crowd of people and boats jostling to get onto the water. The sea still gives a living to many in the area though and Brancaster Staithe is famed for its mussels, which may be bought locally at The Fish Shed along the coast road. Just off the coast of Brancaster Staithe, Scolt Head Island is a four mile long sand bar housing a National Nature Reserve well-known for terns, oystercatchers, and ringed plovers. You can take a boat trip with Branta Cruises to visit the island. The village is a picturesque one, with typical flint walling on many cottages, and popular with second home owners and holiday makers. There is good beer and food available throughout the day at the Jolly Sailor's pub, or for more of a treat with stunning views and delicious food there is The White Horse overlooking the marshes which has just been voted the county's eatery for 2018 in the National Pub and Bar awards. Next to Brancaster Staithe is Burnham Deepdale which has a Norman church, a visitors centre and a good selection of shops, including a small supermarket, Fat Face and Gone Crabbing. After a brisk walk on the beach or an invigorating sail there's nothing better than a trip to the ever popular Deepdale Café, renowned for its hearty English breakfasts.
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Brancaster Staithe
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A bustling village with an attractive harbour which is just to the east of Brancaster (staithe means wharf, or landing stage). There is a well-supported sailing club here and in the summer at high tide there is always a crowd of people and boats jostling to get onto the water. The sea still gives a living to many in the area though and Brancaster Staithe is famed for its mussels, which may be bought locally at The Fish Shed along the coast road. Just off the coast of Brancaster Staithe, Scolt Head Island is a four mile long sand bar housing a National Nature Reserve well-known for terns, oystercatchers, and ringed plovers. You can take a boat trip with Branta Cruises to visit the island. The village is a picturesque one, with typical flint walling on many cottages, and popular with second home owners and holiday makers. There is good beer and food available throughout the day at the Jolly Sailor's pub, or for more of a treat with stunning views and delicious food there is The White Horse overlooking the marshes which has just been voted the county's eatery for 2018 in the National Pub and Bar awards. Next to Brancaster Staithe is Burnham Deepdale which has a Norman church, a visitors centre and a good selection of shops, including a small supermarket, Fat Face and Gone Crabbing. After a brisk walk on the beach or an invigorating sail there's nothing better than a trip to the ever popular Deepdale Café, renowned for its hearty English breakfasts.
All roads in North Norfolk seem to lead to Docking. It's a busy village with an excellent small supermarket and post office, a fish and chip shop, blacksmith, village pub, a large village playing field, tennis court and bowling green. It also has its own weekly village market every Wednesday morning at The Ripper Hall between 9am and 1pm, where a great selection of local produce is available. On Mondays freshly cooked wood-fired pizzas are available from Bordolis outside Ripper Hall - delicious! Docking also has its own coarse fishing lake that is available on a day ticket basis. The village is perfectly placed for the North Norfolk Coast and its long, fine sandy beaches. Brancaster and The Royal West Norfolk Golf Club are about five miles away. There are two golf courses in Hunstanton, which is less than eight miles away. The Titchwell Bird Reserve, home to terns and waders is close by. The ultra-fashionable Georgian village of Burnham Market, Sandringham and the market towns of Fakenham and King's Lynn are also nearby.
Docking
All roads in North Norfolk seem to lead to Docking. It's a busy village with an excellent small supermarket and post office, a fish and chip shop, blacksmith, village pub, a large village playing field, tennis court and bowling green. It also has its own weekly village market every Wednesday morning at The Ripper Hall between 9am and 1pm, where a great selection of local produce is available. On Mondays freshly cooked wood-fired pizzas are available from Bordolis outside Ripper Hall - delicious! Docking also has its own coarse fishing lake that is available on a day ticket basis. The village is perfectly placed for the North Norfolk Coast and its long, fine sandy beaches. Brancaster and The Royal West Norfolk Golf Club are about five miles away. There are two golf courses in Hunstanton, which is less than eight miles away. The Titchwell Bird Reserve, home to terns and waders is close by. The ultra-fashionable Georgian village of Burnham Market, Sandringham and the market towns of Fakenham and King's Lynn are also nearby.
Houghton is a small rural village renowned for being home to Houghton Hall which is one of England's finest Palladian country houses. It was built by Great Britain‘s first Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole and was passed to the Cholmondeley family through marriage at the end of the eighteenth century. Houghton Hall was built in the 1720s and has a unique history and interior, making it a wonderful place to visit with its award-winning five-acre garden, the contemporary sculpture park, the model soldier museum, playground and restaurant.
Houghton
Houghton is a small rural village renowned for being home to Houghton Hall which is one of England's finest Palladian country houses. It was built by Great Britain‘s first Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole and was passed to the Cholmondeley family through marriage at the end of the eighteenth century. Houghton Hall was built in the 1720s and has a unique history and interior, making it a wonderful place to visit with its award-winning five-acre garden, the contemporary sculpture park, the model soldier museum, playground and restaurant.
A small unspoilt village which is about 6 miles away from the stunning North Norfolk coast and only 5 minutes drive to the charming Georgian village of Burnham Market. It has a large duck pond and playing fields with a popular children's play area. There is an excellent village pub, The Duck Inn, which has been refurbished throughout and is highly acclaimed (The 2017 Good Food Guide Restaurant of the Year for the East of England). Stanhoe is ideally located, within 10-15 minutes drive to the beautiful North Norfolk coast with its wide-open sandy beaches at Brancaster, Holme-next-the-Sea and Thornham.
Stanhoe
A small unspoilt village which is about 6 miles away from the stunning North Norfolk coast and only 5 minutes drive to the charming Georgian village of Burnham Market. It has a large duck pond and playing fields with a popular children's play area. There is an excellent village pub, The Duck Inn, which has been refurbished throughout and is highly acclaimed (The 2017 Good Food Guide Restaurant of the Year for the East of England). Stanhoe is ideally located, within 10-15 minutes drive to the beautiful North Norfolk coast with its wide-open sandy beaches at Brancaster, Holme-next-the-Sea and Thornham.
A coastal village in between Thornham and Brancaster which is well-known for the highly acclaimed RSPB Reserve. It is home to the renowned Titchwell Manor Hotel and Restaurant which serves high-quality food throughout the day. Also here is Briarfields Hotel with its stunning views across the marshes and out to sea.
Titchwell
A coastal village in between Thornham and Brancaster which is well-known for the highly acclaimed RSPB Reserve. It is home to the renowned Titchwell Manor Hotel and Restaurant which serves high-quality food throughout the day. Also here is Briarfields Hotel with its stunning views across the marshes and out to sea.
A delightful Georgian village which is situated a stones throw away from the glorious North Norfolk coastline and is the largest of the seven Burnham villages. At its centre is a large village green surrounded by striking Queen Anne and Georgian buildings, with two churches that lie at each end of its broad main street. Unlike many other English towns which are dominated by multiples, Burnham Market has a traditional post office, butcher, hardware shop, fish shop and chemist for all the necessities of everyday life, but there are also over 30 highly original independent and specialist shops, selling a wide range of exciting deli products, vibrant and stylish accessories for home and garden, smart clothes shops, and books old and new. There are some great places to eat, including the renowned Hoste Arms which is a 17th Century old coaching house, the stylish new No Twenty 9 bar and restaurant, the highly rated North Street Bistro and newly opened Socius in Foundry Field. As a result Burnham Market attracts many celebrities and cosmopolitan visitors and is vibrant and bustling in the holiday periods, earning the nickname Chelsea-on-Sea. There is an annual August craft fair and in November the picturesque Christmas lights are turned on, making the village the perfect place to visit for Christmas shopping.
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Burnham Market
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A delightful Georgian village which is situated a stones throw away from the glorious North Norfolk coastline and is the largest of the seven Burnham villages. At its centre is a large village green surrounded by striking Queen Anne and Georgian buildings, with two churches that lie at each end of its broad main street. Unlike many other English towns which are dominated by multiples, Burnham Market has a traditional post office, butcher, hardware shop, fish shop and chemist for all the necessities of everyday life, but there are also over 30 highly original independent and specialist shops, selling a wide range of exciting deli products, vibrant and stylish accessories for home and garden, smart clothes shops, and books old and new. There are some great places to eat, including the renowned Hoste Arms which is a 17th Century old coaching house, the stylish new No Twenty 9 bar and restaurant, the highly rated North Street Bistro and newly opened Socius in Foundry Field. As a result Burnham Market attracts many celebrities and cosmopolitan visitors and is vibrant and bustling in the holiday periods, earning the nickname Chelsea-on-Sea. There is an annual August craft fair and in November the picturesque Christmas lights are turned on, making the village the perfect place to visit for Christmas shopping.
A pretty coastal village with a busy harbour which used to be predominantly a fishing village, but is now a very popular place for sailors, walkers and bird-watchers, with the area being designated as an area of outstanding natural beauty. There is an excellent local gastro-pub called The Hero which re-opened after extensive refurbishment and has quickly gained a great reputation. During the summer there is a ferry out to the nature reserve of Scolt Head Island, a bird and seal sanctuary. For the more energetic it takes about 30 minutes to walk along the coastal footpath across the marshes out to the vast expanse of sandy beach which is quite often deserted. The large black Burnham Overy windmill dominates the skyline for miles around and on the outskirts of village, there is a fine collection of 18th-century mill-buildings next to the river Burn.
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Burnham Overy Staithe
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A pretty coastal village with a busy harbour which used to be predominantly a fishing village, but is now a very popular place for sailors, walkers and bird-watchers, with the area being designated as an area of outstanding natural beauty. There is an excellent local gastro-pub called The Hero which re-opened after extensive refurbishment and has quickly gained a great reputation. During the summer there is a ferry out to the nature reserve of Scolt Head Island, a bird and seal sanctuary. For the more energetic it takes about 30 minutes to walk along the coastal footpath across the marshes out to the vast expanse of sandy beach which is quite often deserted. The large black Burnham Overy windmill dominates the skyline for miles around and on the outskirts of village, there is a fine collection of 18th-century mill-buildings next to the river Burn.
Wells-next-the Sea is the runaway winner of the first Sunday Times "Beach of the Year" award. It's a delightful unspoilt historic town on the North Norfolk Coast with a jumble of old buildings and lanes still existing from its heritage as a port and former maltings industry. The picturesque quay and waterfront is still very much a working port with fishing boats still berthed in this small harbour and stalls selling locally caught shrimps, crabs and whelks. A popular place with sailors with many sailing and leisure craft here and local sailing tuition available. Children enjoy the facilities round the quay and the challenge of crabbing (gillying) from the steep harbour wall. The main shopping area of Wells is Staithe Street, a narrow, mostly pedestrianised lane with surviving Victorian and Edwardian shop fronts, that runs from the water's edge right up to the top part of town. In the centre of the town is The Buttlands which is a large rectangular green lined with Georgian and late Victorian houses, which used to be used for archery practise in medieval days. Now it is home to the excellent Crown hotel and restaurant which is run by Kiwi celebrity chef Chris Coubrough, as well as the popular The Globe Inn. The sandy beach flanked by pine forest is about a mile from the quay and can be reached by road, on foot along the causeway or via the miniature railway. Holkham Hall with its impressive 18th-century Palladian architecture and 3,000-acre deer park is only a couple of miles away along the coast road.
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Wells-next-the-Sea
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Wells-next-the Sea is the runaway winner of the first Sunday Times "Beach of the Year" award. It's a delightful unspoilt historic town on the North Norfolk Coast with a jumble of old buildings and lanes still existing from its heritage as a port and former maltings industry. The picturesque quay and waterfront is still very much a working port with fishing boats still berthed in this small harbour and stalls selling locally caught shrimps, crabs and whelks. A popular place with sailors with many sailing and leisure craft here and local sailing tuition available. Children enjoy the facilities round the quay and the challenge of crabbing (gillying) from the steep harbour wall. The main shopping area of Wells is Staithe Street, a narrow, mostly pedestrianised lane with surviving Victorian and Edwardian shop fronts, that runs from the water's edge right up to the top part of town. In the centre of the town is The Buttlands which is a large rectangular green lined with Georgian and late Victorian houses, which used to be used for archery practise in medieval days. Now it is home to the excellent Crown hotel and restaurant which is run by Kiwi celebrity chef Chris Coubrough, as well as the popular The Globe Inn. The sandy beach flanked by pine forest is about a mile from the quay and can be reached by road, on foot along the causeway or via the miniature railway. Holkham Hall with its impressive 18th-century Palladian architecture and 3,000-acre deer park is only a couple of miles away along the coast road.
Cromer is a popular seaside town on the north Norfolk coast and is proudly known as ‘The Gem of the Norfolk Coast’. Cromer, EastThe town stands high and bracing on the wind swept cliffs, with several paths that zig and zag down from the town to the sandy beaches below. Cromer combines the charm of the ancient fishing town with the hustle and bustle of a modern seaside resort. There’s much evidence of the ancient town for those that wish to discover the maze of twisting streets close to the 14th Century Parish Church of St Peter & St Paul. The church’s impressive 160ft high tower is the tallest in Norfolk and dominates the town. After walking up the 172 steps to the top of the tower you can see for miles – west towards the ‘Runtons’ and Sheringham, east towards the lighthouse.
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Cromer
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Cromer is a popular seaside town on the north Norfolk coast and is proudly known as ‘The Gem of the Norfolk Coast’. Cromer, EastThe town stands high and bracing on the wind swept cliffs, with several paths that zig and zag down from the town to the sandy beaches below. Cromer combines the charm of the ancient fishing town with the hustle and bustle of a modern seaside resort. There’s much evidence of the ancient town for those that wish to discover the maze of twisting streets close to the 14th Century Parish Church of St Peter & St Paul. The church’s impressive 160ft high tower is the tallest in Norfolk and dominates the town. After walking up the 172 steps to the top of the tower you can see for miles – west towards the ‘Runtons’ and Sheringham, east towards the lighthouse.
A selection of eateries.
A list of some of or favourite eateries around the North Norfolk Coastline. We hope you enjoy.
Thornham, Hunstanton PE36 6LX We say “we are more than a Deli”, and one visit to Thornham Deli explains what we mean. We began life serving fabulous food and drink, and this remains at the heart of all we do, but we are also so much more. Within the Deli itself, the first thing you will see is our fantastic deli counter, packed full of tasty treats. Savoury snacks, sweet pastries, tempting cakes, antipasto and a range of Norfolk cheeses and charcuterie – it really is a feast for the eyes. We also pride ourselves on serving the best coffee on the coast and our trained baristas ensure you get a perfect cup of Joe every time. The ideal partner to a piece of home-made cake.
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Thornham Deli
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Thornham, Hunstanton PE36 6LX We say “we are more than a Deli”, and one visit to Thornham Deli explains what we mean. We began life serving fabulous food and drink, and this remains at the heart of all we do, but we are also so much more. Within the Deli itself, the first thing you will see is our fantastic deli counter, packed full of tasty treats. Savoury snacks, sweet pastries, tempting cakes, antipasto and a range of Norfolk cheeses and charcuterie – it really is a feast for the eyes. We also pride ourselves on serving the best coffee on the coast and our trained baristas ensure you get a perfect cup of Joe every time. The ideal partner to a piece of home-made cake.
Ship Lane, Thornham, Hunstanton PE36 6LT Tucked along a hidden lane behind Thornham's All Saints Church you'll discover an oasis of calm in an unrivalled location with nothing between us and the salt marsh, sand and sea just beyond. With some of the UK's best local producers on our doorstep, we're proud to be able to showcase locally-reared meats, freshly caught fish and Norfolk grown vegetables on our comprehensive, home-cooked menu. Our Head Chef, Peter Howard, and his dedicated, highly skilled team knows just how to make the most of this locally-grown fayre. Our menus evolve constantly and feature seasonal produce while it is at its best. From delicious, set-you-up-for-the-day hearty breakfasts, to traditional lunchtime or evening meals like fish and chips, country pates, ploughman's platters, crisp salads, hearty soups and stews and the best Sunday roasts, rest assured that each and every dish is sourced, prepared and cooked with provenance in mind, from field, sea or river to fork. Catering for all dietary requirements (vegan, gluten-free, dairy -free), we also provide a well-balanced children's menu. Small groups with set menus for any occasion, whether it's breakfast, lunch or dinner, can also be catered for.
The Lifeboat Inn
Ship Lane, Thornham, Hunstanton PE36 6LT Tucked along a hidden lane behind Thornham's All Saints Church you'll discover an oasis of calm in an unrivalled location with nothing between us and the salt marsh, sand and sea just beyond. With some of the UK's best local producers on our doorstep, we're proud to be able to showcase locally-reared meats, freshly caught fish and Norfolk grown vegetables on our comprehensive, home-cooked menu. Our Head Chef, Peter Howard, and his dedicated, highly skilled team knows just how to make the most of this locally-grown fayre. Our menus evolve constantly and feature seasonal produce while it is at its best. From delicious, set-you-up-for-the-day hearty breakfasts, to traditional lunchtime or evening meals like fish and chips, country pates, ploughman's platters, crisp salads, hearty soups and stews and the best Sunday roasts, rest assured that each and every dish is sourced, prepared and cooked with provenance in mind, from field, sea or river to fork. Catering for all dietary requirements (vegan, gluten-free, dairy -free), we also provide a well-balanced children's menu. Small groups with set menus for any occasion, whether it's breakfast, lunch or dinner, can also be catered for.
High St, Thornham, Hunstanton PE36 6LY Dating back to the 16th century, this pretty village inn on the North Norfolk coast is a welcoming sight for visitors wanting somewhere enticing to stay, relax and enjoy a great meal in comfort. Combining rustic charm and contemporary style, The Chequers Inn has a compelling atmosphere making it popular with both locals and visitors from further afield. Inside you will find a traditional bar with a warm country feel, a vast open fire and low beamed ceiling. Enjoy a pint of real ale and a pub meal by the crackling fire, or try the a la carte menu with daily changing specials in the contemporary dining room. If you are looking for a unique setting for a group gathering, celebration or party our charming courtyard with two cedar wood pavilions offers one of the best al fresco dining experiences on the Norfolk coast. There are also 11 stylish bedrooms, recently refurbished with a coastal theme. The luxurious rooms and en-suite bathrooms offer contemporary 21st century comfort and style to relish in. The Chequers Inn in Thornham is perfectly placed for exploring the subtle beauty of the North Norfolk coast. The stunning beaches of Brancaster and Holkham are close by, as are the nature reserves at RSPB Titchwell and Holme or visit numerous historic houses, including the royal estate at Sandringham. Try the art galleries and delicatessens of Burnham Market or the craft shops and local food stores of Wells- next- the- Sea.
The Chequers Inn
High St, Thornham, Hunstanton PE36 6LY Dating back to the 16th century, this pretty village inn on the North Norfolk coast is a welcoming sight for visitors wanting somewhere enticing to stay, relax and enjoy a great meal in comfort. Combining rustic charm and contemporary style, The Chequers Inn has a compelling atmosphere making it popular with both locals and visitors from further afield. Inside you will find a traditional bar with a warm country feel, a vast open fire and low beamed ceiling. Enjoy a pint of real ale and a pub meal by the crackling fire, or try the a la carte menu with daily changing specials in the contemporary dining room. If you are looking for a unique setting for a group gathering, celebration or party our charming courtyard with two cedar wood pavilions offers one of the best al fresco dining experiences on the Norfolk coast. There are also 11 stylish bedrooms, recently refurbished with a coastal theme. The luxurious rooms and en-suite bathrooms offer contemporary 21st century comfort and style to relish in. The Chequers Inn in Thornham is perfectly placed for exploring the subtle beauty of the North Norfolk coast. The stunning beaches of Brancaster and Holkham are close by, as are the nature reserves at RSPB Titchwell and Holme or visit numerous historic houses, including the royal estate at Sandringham. Try the art galleries and delicatessens of Burnham Market or the craft shops and local food stores of Wells- next- the- Sea.
High St, Thornham, Hunstanton PE36 6LY The Orange Tree is a stylish, contemporary dining pub, nestled in one of North Norfolk’s most beautiful coastal villages. We are a family owned business and strive hard, day and night, to serve award-winning food, from top quality local produce in a laid back, ‘unstuffy’ environment. The OT offers a haven of tranquillity where couples, families and friends are welcomed with open arms.
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The Orange Tree Inn and Restaurant
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High St, Thornham, Hunstanton PE36 6LY The Orange Tree is a stylish, contemporary dining pub, nestled in one of North Norfolk’s most beautiful coastal villages. We are a family owned business and strive hard, day and night, to serve award-winning food, from top quality local produce in a laid back, ‘unstuffy’ environment. The OT offers a haven of tranquillity where couples, families and friends are welcomed with open arms.
6 High St, Ringstead, Hunstanton PE36 5JU The Gin Trap Inn is a traditional and cosy 17th-century coaching inn and has a long and colourful history. It has been a public house since 1668 and the date 1667 can be found on one of the walls of the former farmhouse. Previously known as The Compasses Inn, the name of the pub was changed to The Gin Trap Inn in 1973 when the owners adorned the walls and ceilings with ‘gin traps’. After being closed for some time, the new owner re-opened The Gin Trap Inn on the Easter weekend of 2015. It was decided unanimously amongst the new team at the GT to re-launch the old pub with a new lease of life, removing the old animal traps from every corner of the pub and focusing instead on something we do love: our favourite tipple... GIN!!! Our collection from all corners of the globe has now grown to in excess of 100 gins! As the popularity of The Gin Trap has taken us all by storm, our fabulous customers can now enjoy the fruits of our labour by trying one of our 6 carefully appointed Gin Tasting Boards, served with tonics, garnishes, ice and selected with gins we know you will love.
The Gin Trap Inn
6 High St
6 High St, Ringstead, Hunstanton PE36 5JU The Gin Trap Inn is a traditional and cosy 17th-century coaching inn and has a long and colourful history. It has been a public house since 1668 and the date 1667 can be found on one of the walls of the former farmhouse. Previously known as The Compasses Inn, the name of the pub was changed to The Gin Trap Inn in 1973 when the owners adorned the walls and ceilings with ‘gin traps’. After being closed for some time, the new owner re-opened The Gin Trap Inn on the Easter weekend of 2015. It was decided unanimously amongst the new team at the GT to re-launch the old pub with a new lease of life, removing the old animal traps from every corner of the pub and focusing instead on something we do love: our favourite tipple... GIN!!! Our collection from all corners of the globe has now grown to in excess of 100 gins! As the popularity of The Gin Trap has taken us all by storm, our fabulous customers can now enjoy the fruits of our labour by trying one of our 6 carefully appointed Gin Tasting Boards, served with tonics, garnishes, ice and selected with gins we know you will love.
Caley Mill, Lynn Rd, Heacham PE31 7JE Come visit us and relax in our spacious Tearoom & Restaurant or in the outdoor seating area. Try our homemade, freshly prepared Breakfast and Lunch Menu served daily or our comprehensive Light Bites Menu. We also have a variety of cakes served all day, including our famous Lavender Cake and Lavender Scones.
Norfolk Lavender Tearooms and Restaurant
Caley Mill, Lynn Rd, Heacham PE31 7JE Come visit us and relax in our spacious Tearoom & Restaurant or in the outdoor seating area. Try our homemade, freshly prepared Breakfast and Lunch Menu served daily or our comprehensive Light Bites Menu. We also have a variety of cakes served all day, including our famous Lavender Cake and Lavender Scones.
40 Kirkgate, Hunstanton PE36 6LH Dog-friendly coastal pub. Food served daily. Bookings welcome. Quiz Night. Beer Garden. Close to the beach & coastal walks.
The White Horse Holme
40 Kirkgate
40 Kirkgate, Hunstanton PE36 6LH Dog-friendly coastal pub. Food served daily. Bookings welcome. Quiz Night. Beer Garden. Close to the beach & coastal walks.
Heacham Manor Hotel, Hunstanton Rd, Heacham, Nr Hunstanton PE31 7JX All are welcome to enjoy the homemade and seasonal offering prepared by the Mulberry Restaurant’s talented team of chefs, who are overseen by Neil Rutland, the gifted chef that started the kitchen in 2009. Whenever possible the AA Rosette Mulberry Restaurant strives to take full advantage of the wealth of fantastic produce on its doorstep. Norfolk being such a prolific farming county there certainly is plenty of delectable offerings to be had. The Mulberry Restaurant is open 7 days a week and offers; Breakfasts, Lunches, Afternoon Teas, Dinners and Sunday Lunches. Happy to cater for all, if you have any specific dietary requirements be sure to get in touch as the chefs will be happy to accommodate.
The Mulberry Restaurant
Heacham Manor Hotel, Hunstanton Rd, Heacham, Nr Hunstanton PE31 7JX All are welcome to enjoy the homemade and seasonal offering prepared by the Mulberry Restaurant’s talented team of chefs, who are overseen by Neil Rutland, the gifted chef that started the kitchen in 2009. Whenever possible the AA Rosette Mulberry Restaurant strives to take full advantage of the wealth of fantastic produce on its doorstep. Norfolk being such a prolific farming county there certainly is plenty of delectable offerings to be had. The Mulberry Restaurant is open 7 days a week and offers; Breakfasts, Lunches, Afternoon Teas, Dinners and Sunday Lunches. Happy to cater for all, if you have any specific dietary requirements be sure to get in touch as the chefs will be happy to accommodate.
Sandringham Visitor Centre The Restaurant Norfolk, Sandringham PE35 6EH Visitors to Sandringham Country Park can enjoy year-round freshly cooked food in The Cafe and Coffee Shop. Deborah and her team channel their passion for food into creating daily menus based on seasonal produce from local producers or the Sandringham kitchen garden.
Sandringham Country Park
Sandringham Visitor Centre The Restaurant Norfolk, Sandringham PE35 6EH Visitors to Sandringham Country Park can enjoy year-round freshly cooked food in The Cafe and Coffee Shop. Deborah and her team channel their passion for food into creating daily menus based on seasonal produce from local producers or the Sandringham kitchen garden.
Harbour Way, Brancaster Staithe, King's Lynn PE31 8BW Great seafood – fresh lobster, crab and much more – and baguettes to go. Fresh filled baguettes and local seafood are available from the Crab Hut in Brancaster Staithe Norfolk. Crabs, Lobster & Whelks from their own boat.
The Crab Hut
Harbour Way, Brancaster Staithe, King's Lynn PE31 8BW Great seafood – fresh lobster, crab and much more – and baguettes to go. Fresh filled baguettes and local seafood are available from the Crab Hut in Brancaster Staithe Norfolk. Crabs, Lobster & Whelks from their own boat.
Main Road, Brancaster Staithe, King's Lynn PE31 8BJ Voted the nation’s favourite family pub, our 18th century village local on the Norfolk coast serves real ales from our microbrewery Brancaster Brewery, home cooked wholesome food, great pub clasics including Jolly Smokehouse specials, local seafood, stone baked pizzas and ice cream from a garden beach hut (and not forgetting the largest selection of rum on the coast!) Families, muddy or sandy boots and muddy paws welcome in our pub which is at the heart of village life in scenic North Norfolk, just across the road from Brancaster Staithe harbour and beach.
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The Jolly Sailors Brancaster Staithe
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Main Road, Brancaster Staithe, King's Lynn PE31 8BJ Voted the nation’s favourite family pub, our 18th century village local on the Norfolk coast serves real ales from our microbrewery Brancaster Brewery, home cooked wholesome food, great pub clasics including Jolly Smokehouse specials, local seafood, stone baked pizzas and ice cream from a garden beach hut (and not forgetting the largest selection of rum on the coast!) Families, muddy or sandy boots and muddy paws welcome in our pub which is at the heart of village life in scenic North Norfolk, just across the road from Brancaster Staithe harbour and beach.
Main Rd, Brancaster, King's Lynn PE31 8AP Our restaurant and bar offer some of the very best dining on the Norfolk Coast. Where possible, our ingredients are all locally sourced and being so close to the sea we offer a fantastic array of fresh fish and seafood dishes to satisfy your crustacean cravings! Lunch and dinner are served daily in the restaurant and bar. Take a look at our menus below and if you feel inspired, why not book a table? We offer some dog-friendly tables, as well as a delightful large patio area to enjoy food al fresco when the weather is warm. The Ship also boasts a large car park which can be found at the rear of the Hotel
The Ship Hotel
Main Rd, Brancaster, King's Lynn PE31 8AP Our restaurant and bar offer some of the very best dining on the Norfolk Coast. Where possible, our ingredients are all locally sourced and being so close to the sea we offer a fantastic array of fresh fish and seafood dishes to satisfy your crustacean cravings! Lunch and dinner are served daily in the restaurant and bar. Take a look at our menus below and if you feel inspired, why not book a table? We offer some dog-friendly tables, as well as a delightful large patio area to enjoy food al fresco when the weather is warm. The Ship also boasts a large car park which can be found at the rear of the Hotel
Main Road, Titchwell PE31 8BB Enjoy Norfolk flavours, served with a coastal twist. Briarfields brings together the best ingredients with a simple, stylish dining experience. Our menu changes seasonally with daily specials that feature local meat, fish, seafood and produce.
Briarfields Hotel
Main Road, Titchwell PE31 8BB Enjoy Norfolk flavours, served with a coastal twist. Briarfields brings together the best ingredients with a simple, stylish dining experience. Our menu changes seasonally with daily specials that feature local meat, fish, seafood and produce.
Burnham Rd, Stanhoe, King's Lynn PE31 8QD An award winning rustic-smart gastropub, serving the best in local produce and East Anglian ales. Friendly and efficient service perfectly compliment the incredible food served up by chef patron Ben Handley and his team. Norfolk favourites such as Brancaster crab, steaming bowls of Norfolk mussels, locally-smoked salmon with gingerbread are regular highlights; along with Chef Handley’s famous black pudding-scotched quail’s eggs. Sundays' roasts of local pork and Holkham Estate beef are widely regarded as the best along the coast.
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Duck Inn Stanhoe
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Burnham Rd, Stanhoe, King's Lynn PE31 8QD An award winning rustic-smart gastropub, serving the best in local produce and East Anglian ales. Friendly and efficient service perfectly compliment the incredible food served up by chef patron Ben Handley and his team. Norfolk favourites such as Brancaster crab, steaming bowls of Norfolk mussels, locally-smoked salmon with gingerbread are regular highlights; along with Chef Handley’s famous black pudding-scotched quail’s eggs. Sundays' roasts of local pork and Holkham Estate beef are widely regarded as the best along the coast.
11 Foundry Pl, Burnham Market, King's Lynn PE31 8LG Here at Socius our ethos is simple: to create a memorable food and drink experience in a completely relaxed environment. Located in Foundry Place, just off North Street, Socius offers locally sourced produce in dishes which change to reflect the seasons. Our food is served on small plates and designed to share – as a modern British take on tapas. Our open plan restaurant and kitchen was designed to create a unique and sociable dining experience where guests can enjoy the food and drink on offer, whilst watching our team at work.
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Socius
11 Foundry Place
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11 Foundry Pl, Burnham Market, King's Lynn PE31 8LG Here at Socius our ethos is simple: to create a memorable food and drink experience in a completely relaxed environment. Located in Foundry Place, just off North Street, Socius offers locally sourced produce in dishes which change to reflect the seasons. Our food is served on small plates and designed to share – as a modern British take on tapas. Our open plan restaurant and kitchen was designed to create a unique and sociable dining experience where guests can enjoy the food and drink on offer, whilst watching our team at work.
20 North St, Burnham Market, King's Lynn PE31 8HG Little neighbourhood bistro with a big personality serving plates of proper food using classic French techniques and British produce.
North Street Bistro
20 North St
20 North St, Burnham Market, King's Lynn PE31 8HG Little neighbourhood bistro with a big personality serving plates of proper food using classic French techniques and British produce.
Creake Rd, Burnham Market, King's Lynn PE31 8EA Traditional fish & chip shop
The Mermaid Traditional Fish & Chips
Creake Rd, Burnham Market, King's Lynn PE31 8EA Traditional fish & chip shop
Market Place, Burnham Market, King's Lynn PE31 8HF Tea rooms serving sandwiches, cakes and coffee
Tillys Cafe
Market Place, Burnham Market, King's Lynn PE31 8HF Tea rooms serving sandwiches, cakes and coffee
38-40 Freeman St, Wells-next-the-Sea NR23 1BA We are a small, intimate and informal Restaurant with an ethos to create a friendly, relaxed and welcoming dining experience from our young and enthusiastic team, centred around beautifully prepared local and seasonal seafood dishes, with dishes developed from travels afar and seafood platters being a popular constant. Although we will be offering a smattering of ‘landlubber’ dishes on our monthly menu to make sure every taste is catered for.
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Wells Crab House Seafood Restaurant
38-40 Freeman St
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38-40 Freeman St, Wells-next-the-Sea NR23 1BA We are a small, intimate and informal Restaurant with an ethos to create a friendly, relaxed and welcoming dining experience from our young and enthusiastic team, centred around beautifully prepared local and seasonal seafood dishes, with dishes developed from travels afar and seafood platters being a popular constant. Although we will be offering a smattering of ‘landlubber’ dishes on our monthly menu to make sure every taste is catered for.
Beach Road, Wells-next-the-Sea NR23 1DR The Beach Café at Beach Road, Wells-next-the-Sea is in an idyllic location backed by mature pinewoods and a stone’s throw from the beach. It’s a fun and vibrant place to eat, drink and meet. We’ve got indoor and outdoor seating and there’s WiFi if you need it. Eat in or take away, you’re bound to find a good reason to drop in. Enjoy fresh local produce at its best. We have sandwiches and rolls made each day with various tempting fillings, along with sausage rolls, pasties and pastry slices. To start off the day, our bacon or sausage baps are just the treat. If it’s coffee and cake your looking for, then our cake table just oozes temptation and our excellent, 100% rain forest alliance certified coffee, or a delicious hot chocolate topped with cream, are a good choice. In the winter months enjoy a warming cup of soup in front of the wood-burning fire and then when the warmer weather arrives its time for everyone’s favourite - ice lollies!
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Wells-next-the-Sea Beach Cafe
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Beach Road, Wells-next-the-Sea NR23 1DR The Beach Café at Beach Road, Wells-next-the-Sea is in an idyllic location backed by mature pinewoods and a stone’s throw from the beach. It’s a fun and vibrant place to eat, drink and meet. We’ve got indoor and outdoor seating and there’s WiFi if you need it. Eat in or take away, you’re bound to find a good reason to drop in. Enjoy fresh local produce at its best. We have sandwiches and rolls made each day with various tempting fillings, along with sausage rolls, pasties and pastry slices. To start off the day, our bacon or sausage baps are just the treat. If it’s coffee and cake your looking for, then our cake table just oozes temptation and our excellent, 100% rain forest alliance certified coffee, or a delicious hot chocolate topped with cream, are a good choice. In the winter months enjoy a warming cup of soup in front of the wood-burning fire and then when the warmer weather arrives its time for everyone’s favourite - ice lollies!
Drove Orchards, Thornham, Hunstanton PE36 6LS Gurneys was set up by Mike Gurney around forty years ago when he learnt to grow oysters in the creeks and how to smoke fish. Our first fish shop in Brancaster was just ten square feet and was known as the Hole in the wall. It was the first fishmongers on the coast road. In 1992 we opened up in Burnham Market selling the very best in locally produced smoked fish, shellfish and wet fish, mainly landed locally.
Gurneys Fish Shop Thornham
Drove Orchards, Thornham, Hunstanton PE36 6LS Gurneys was set up by Mike Gurney around forty years ago when he learnt to grow oysters in the creeks and how to smoke fish. Our first fish shop in Brancaster was just ten square feet and was known as the Hole in the wall. It was the first fishmongers on the coast road. In 1992 we opened up in Burnham Market selling the very best in locally produced smoked fish, shellfish and wet fish, mainly landed locally.
28 Market Place, Burnham Market, King's Lynn PE31 8HF Gurneys was set up by Mike Gurney around forty years ago when he learnt to grow oysters in the creeks and how to smoke fish. Our first fish shop in Brancaster was just ten square feet and was known as the Hole in the wall. It was the first fishmongers on the coast road. In 1992 we opened up in Burnham Market selling the very best in locally produced smoked fish, shellfish and wet fish, mainly landed locally.
Gurneys Fish Shop
28 Market Place, Burnham Market, King's Lynn PE31 8HF Gurneys was set up by Mike Gurney around forty years ago when he learnt to grow oysters in the creeks and how to smoke fish. Our first fish shop in Brancaster was just ten square feet and was known as the Hole in the wall. It was the first fishmongers on the coast road. In 1992 we opened up in Burnham Market selling the very best in locally produced smoked fish, shellfish and wet fish, mainly landed locally.
Beacon Hill Road, Burnham Market, King's Lynn NR21 9LN Tours and events Burn Valley Vineyard truly is a family project. Located on our family farm in North Creake, we two sisters work alongside our brother who farms the land surrounding the vineyard. The idea of growing grapes was born in 2015 after a ‘eureka!’ moment for our father, John Robinson. We are immensely proud to call Norfolk our home and wanted to capture its essence in a bottle. We aim to produce simply the best wines which can be enjoyed amongst your own friends and family.
Burn Valley Vineyard
Beacon Hill Road, Burnham Market, King's Lynn NR21 9LN Tours and events Burn Valley Vineyard truly is a family project. Located on our family farm in North Creake, we two sisters work alongside our brother who farms the land surrounding the vineyard. The idea of growing grapes was born in 2015 after a ‘eureka!’ moment for our father, John Robinson. We are immensely proud to call Norfolk our home and wanted to capture its essence in a bottle. We aim to produce simply the best wines which can be enjoyed amongst your own friends and family.
Thornham Rd, Thornham, Hunstanton, Norfolk PE36 6LS Our aim is to provide an experience that brings together the best of life on the North Norfolk Coast. Within walking distance of the sea and set in over 350 acres of orchards, farmland and wild meadows, our farm shop, fishmonger and award-winning restaurants offer the best of local produce. Our kitchen garden supplies seasonal fruit and vegetables all the year round and our range of juices are made with fruit grown and pressed on-site using traditional methods. Other highlights include a range of lifestyle shopping and a truly unique antiques market. For those that feel active, we invite you to explore the Heritage Orchards, where we grow over 160 varieties of apples and pears, with 120 of these being of East Anglian heritage. We offer Pick Your Own apples, pears and seasonal soft fruits and you can even stay on the farm in one of our Wild Luxury lodges. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any enquiries and we hope that you will pay us a visit soon.
Drove Orchards Farm Shop
Thornham Rd, Thornham, Hunstanton, Norfolk PE36 6LS Our aim is to provide an experience that brings together the best of life on the North Norfolk Coast. Within walking distance of the sea and set in over 350 acres of orchards, farmland and wild meadows, our farm shop, fishmonger and award-winning restaurants offer the best of local produce. Our kitchen garden supplies seasonal fruit and vegetables all the year round and our range of juices are made with fruit grown and pressed on-site using traditional methods. Other highlights include a range of lifestyle shopping and a truly unique antiques market. For those that feel active, we invite you to explore the Heritage Orchards, where we grow over 160 varieties of apples and pears, with 120 of these being of East Anglian heritage. We offer Pick Your Own apples, pears and seasonal soft fruits and you can even stay on the farm in one of our Wild Luxury lodges. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any enquiries and we hope that you will pay us a visit soon.
Drove Orchards, Thornham Rd Thornham PE36 6LS Eric’s Fish & Chips harks back to the traditional British fish and chip restaurants of the past, blending that nostalgia with a modern European menu influence.
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Eric's Fish and Chips
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Drove Orchards, Thornham Rd Thornham PE36 6LS Eric’s Fish & Chips harks back to the traditional British fish and chip restaurants of the past, blending that nostalgia with a modern European menu influence.
Old Church Road, Snettisham PE31 7LX from a Norfolk village inn – twisting passages and hidden corners, low ceilings and old beams, pamment floors and log fires, excellent beers, friendly staff and a relaxed, informal atmosphere.
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The Rose & Crown, Snettisham
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Old Church Road, Snettisham PE31 7LX from a Norfolk village inn – twisting passages and hidden corners, low ceilings and old beams, pamment floors and log fires, excellent beers, friendly staff and a relaxed, informal atmosphere.
Activities
A small selection of activities to get you going.
Seagate Rd, Hunstanton PE36 5BH Hunstanton SEA LIFE Sanctuary is a state-of-the-art marine aquarium taking visitors on a memorable undersea odyssey filled with amazing close encounters with sea creatures of astonishing variety and meet our friendly team of Rainforest Rangers who are ready to show you some of their jungle beasties and creepy crawlies. NEW FOR 2018: Penguin Beach! - Learn how to waddle with our charming colony of Humboldt Penguins, walk along the penguin trail and watch them glide underwater as you get really close to these amazing birds.
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Hunstanton SEA LIFE Sanctuary
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Seagate Rd, Hunstanton PE36 5BH Hunstanton SEA LIFE Sanctuary is a state-of-the-art marine aquarium taking visitors on a memorable undersea odyssey filled with amazing close encounters with sea creatures of astonishing variety and meet our friendly team of Rainforest Rangers who are ready to show you some of their jungle beasties and creepy crawlies. NEW FOR 2018: Penguin Beach! - Learn how to waddle with our charming colony of Humboldt Penguins, walk along the penguin trail and watch them glide underwater as you get really close to these amazing birds.
Main Rd, Titchwell, King's Lynn PE31 8BB Titchwell Marsh is an English nature reserve owned and managed by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. its 171 hectares (420 acres) include reed beds, saltmarshes, a freshwater lagoon and sandy beach, with a small woodland area near the car park. This internationally important reserve is part of the North Norfolk Coast Site of Special Scientific Interest and the Norfolk Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and is also protected through Natura 2000, Special Protection Area and Ramsar listings. The reserve is important for some scarce breeding birds, such as pied avocets on the islands, and western marsh harriers, Eurasian bitterns and bearded reedlings in the reeds. To encourage bitterns to breed, the reed beds have been improved to make them wetter, and the lagoon has been stocked with the common rudd. Typical wetland birds such as the water rail, reed warbler and sedge warbler also appear, and little egrets are common. The reserve has regularly attracted rarities, as its location is important for migrating birds. Ducks and geese winter at Titchwell in considerable numbers, and the reserve shelters the endangered European water vole. Facilities include three bird hides, a sea watching platform, two nature trails, and a visitor centre. Because of concerns about climate change, a major project in 2010 and 2011 brought improvements to the banks around the freshwater lagoon and the conversion of the brackish lagoon to tidal saltmarsh, a more effective barrier to encroachment by the sea.
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RSPB Titchwell Marsh
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Main Rd, Titchwell, King's Lynn PE31 8BB Titchwell Marsh is an English nature reserve owned and managed by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. its 171 hectares (420 acres) include reed beds, saltmarshes, a freshwater lagoon and sandy beach, with a small woodland area near the car park. This internationally important reserve is part of the North Norfolk Coast Site of Special Scientific Interest and the Norfolk Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and is also protected through Natura 2000, Special Protection Area and Ramsar listings. The reserve is important for some scarce breeding birds, such as pied avocets on the islands, and western marsh harriers, Eurasian bitterns and bearded reedlings in the reeds. To encourage bitterns to breed, the reed beds have been improved to make them wetter, and the lagoon has been stocked with the common rudd. Typical wetland birds such as the water rail, reed warbler and sedge warbler also appear, and little egrets are common. The reserve has regularly attracted rarities, as its location is important for migrating birds. Ducks and geese winter at Titchwell in considerable numbers, and the reserve shelters the endangered European water vole. Facilities include three bird hides, a sea watching platform, two nature trails, and a visitor centre. Because of concerns about climate change, a major project in 2010 and 2011 brought improvements to the banks around the freshwater lagoon and the conversion of the brackish lagoon to tidal saltmarsh, a more effective barrier to encroachment by the sea.
Pensthorpe Rd, Fakenham NR21 0LN Pensthorpe Natural Park aims to inspire every generation by offering something for the whole family - from young children through to grandparents and everything in between. Pensthorpe offers a variety of activities and experiences that bring you closer to nature and allows you to explore the 700 acre reserve as a family. There are fascinating conservation projects you can discover including red squirrels, corncrakes, cranes and turtle doves; 5 stunning gardens, some of which are designed by renowned landscape designers and are home to a secret sculpture trail and; unique to Pensthorpe, 4 varied habitats including wetlands, woodlands, grasslands and farmland which each attract their own intriguing species. After exploring the further reaches of the reserve families can enjoy the award winning outdoor and indoor adventure play areas, WildRootz and Hootz House. There is enough here to keep everyone active and on a journey of discovery together for a whole day.
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Pensthorpe Natural Park
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Pensthorpe Rd, Fakenham NR21 0LN Pensthorpe Natural Park aims to inspire every generation by offering something for the whole family - from young children through to grandparents and everything in between. Pensthorpe offers a variety of activities and experiences that bring you closer to nature and allows you to explore the 700 acre reserve as a family. There are fascinating conservation projects you can discover including red squirrels, corncrakes, cranes and turtle doves; 5 stunning gardens, some of which are designed by renowned landscape designers and are home to a secret sculpture trail and; unique to Pensthorpe, 4 varied habitats including wetlands, woodlands, grasslands and farmland which each attract their own intriguing species. After exploring the further reaches of the reserve families can enjoy the award winning outdoor and indoor adventure play areas, WildRootz and Hootz House. There is enough here to keep everyone active and on a journey of discovery together for a whole day.
Holkham Rd, Wells-next-the-Sea NR23 1AB Steeped in history, Holkham Hall on the north Norfolk coast has the perfect setting; surrounded by rolling parkland, rich in wildlife. This magnificent 18th-century Palladian hall is home is to the Earls of Leicester and the family takes great pride in sharing the house and its treasures with visitors. The state rooms offer superb collections of ancient statuary, original furniture, tapestries and paintings by Rubens, Van Dyck, Gaspar Poussin and Gainsborough. Learn about Holkham’s unique agricultural heritage in the ‘Field to Fork Experience’ with its interwoven stories of crop production, gamekeeping and conservation and how this all contributes to produce the food on your fork. Explore the children’s woodland adventure play area, hire bikes or a boat, and enjoy the colourful plantings and scents in the historic walled garden. New for 2019 you’ll find Holkham’s Ropes Course! Get your feet off the ground and embark on a treetop adventure over wobbly crossings, swinging bridges, see saws and best of all zip wires to get you safely back on terra firma. Your visit must also include the café and gift shop, both showcasing the work and produce of local artisan suppliers.
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Holkham Hall
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Holkham Rd, Wells-next-the-Sea NR23 1AB Steeped in history, Holkham Hall on the north Norfolk coast has the perfect setting; surrounded by rolling parkland, rich in wildlife. This magnificent 18th-century Palladian hall is home is to the Earls of Leicester and the family takes great pride in sharing the house and its treasures with visitors. The state rooms offer superb collections of ancient statuary, original furniture, tapestries and paintings by Rubens, Van Dyck, Gaspar Poussin and Gainsborough. Learn about Holkham’s unique agricultural heritage in the ‘Field to Fork Experience’ with its interwoven stories of crop production, gamekeeping and conservation and how this all contributes to produce the food on your fork. Explore the children’s woodland adventure play area, hire bikes or a boat, and enjoy the colourful plantings and scents in the historic walled garden. New for 2019 you’ll find Holkham’s Ropes Course! Get your feet off the ground and embark on a treetop adventure over wobbly crossings, swinging bridges, see saws and best of all zip wires to get you safely back on terra firma. Your visit must also include the café and gift shop, both showcasing the work and produce of local artisan suppliers.
Beach Rd, Wells-next-the-Sea NR23 1DR The beach at Holkham is one of the most unspoilt and beautiful stretches of sand in the country. Behind the shoreline lies a semi-circular basin, which, at very high tides, rapidly fills to form a spectacular shallow lagoon. The actress Gwyneth Paltrow walked across Holkham sand at low tide during the closing scenes of the film ‘Shakespeare in Love’.
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Holkham beach
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Beach Rd, Wells-next-the-Sea NR23 1DR The beach at Holkham is one of the most unspoilt and beautiful stretches of sand in the country. Behind the shoreline lies a semi-circular basin, which, at very high tides, rapidly fills to form a spectacular shallow lagoon. The actress Gwyneth Paltrow walked across Holkham sand at low tide during the closing scenes of the film ‘Shakespeare in Love’.
Lady Ann's Rd, Holkham, Wells-next-the-Sea NR23 1RG Holkham National Nature Reserve is England's largest national nature reserve (NNR). It is on the Norfolk coast between Burnham Overy Staithe and Blakeney, and is managed by Natural England with the cooperation of the Holkham Estate. Its 3,900 hectares (9,600 acres) comprise a wide range of habitats, including grazing marsh, woodland, salt marsh, sand dunes and foreshore. The reserve is part of the North Norfolk Coast Site of Special Scientific Interest, and the larger area is additionally protected through Natura 2000, Special Protection Area (SPA) and Ramsar listings, and is part of both an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) and a World Biosphere Reserve. Holkham NNR is important for its wintering wildfowl, especially pink-footed geese, Eurasian wigeon and brant geese, but it also has breeding waders, and attracts many migrating birds in autumn. A number of scarce invertebrates and plants can be found in the dunes, and the reserve is one of the only two sites in the UK to have an antlion colony.
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Holkham National Nature Reserve
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Lady Ann's Rd, Holkham, Wells-next-the-Sea NR23 1RG Holkham National Nature Reserve is England's largest national nature reserve (NNR). It is on the Norfolk coast between Burnham Overy Staithe and Blakeney, and is managed by Natural England with the cooperation of the Holkham Estate. Its 3,900 hectares (9,600 acres) comprise a wide range of habitats, including grazing marsh, woodland, salt marsh, sand dunes and foreshore. The reserve is part of the North Norfolk Coast Site of Special Scientific Interest, and the larger area is additionally protected through Natura 2000, Special Protection Area (SPA) and Ramsar listings, and is part of both an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) and a World Biosphere Reserve. Holkham NNR is important for its wintering wildfowl, especially pink-footed geese, Eurasian wigeon and brant geese, but it also has breeding waders, and attracts many migrating birds in autumn. A number of scarce invertebrates and plants can be found in the dunes, and the reserve is one of the only two sites in the UK to have an antlion colony.
The Norfolk Coast Path is a footpath in Norfolk, running 83 miles (133.5 km) from Hunstanton to Hopton-on-Sea. It was opened in 1986 and covers the North Norfolk Coast AONB (Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty). It links with the Peddars Way at Holme-next-the-Sea, and the two in combination form the Peddars Way & Norfolk Coast Path National Trail, one of 15 National Trails in England and Wales. It links to the Angles Way and the Wherryman's Way at Great Yarmouth, and to both ends of the Weavers' Way, at Cromer and Great Yarmouth. In December 2014, the trail was extended to Sea Palling and forms part of the England Coast Path. In October 2016, the trail was further extended to Hopton-on-Sea.
Norfolk Coast Path
The Norfolk Coast Path is a footpath in Norfolk, running 83 miles (133.5 km) from Hunstanton to Hopton-on-Sea. It was opened in 1986 and covers the North Norfolk Coast AONB (Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty). It links with the Peddars Way at Holme-next-the-Sea, and the two in combination form the Peddars Way & Norfolk Coast Path National Trail, one of 15 National Trails in England and Wales. It links to the Angles Way and the Wherryman's Way at Great Yarmouth, and to both ends of the Weavers' Way, at Cromer and Great Yarmouth. In December 2014, the trail was extended to Sea Palling and forms part of the England Coast Path. In October 2016, the trail was further extended to Hopton-on-Sea.
Morston Quay, Morston NR25 7BH Tel: 01263 740505 Seasonal, hour-long boat trips providing up-close views of seals, migrant birds & Blakeney Point.
Beans Boat Trips
69 Morston Rd
Morston Quay, Morston NR25 7BH Tel: 01263 740505 Seasonal, hour-long boat trips providing up-close views of seals, migrant birds & Blakeney Point.
Stations at: Wells-Next-the-Sea off A149 NR23 1QB & Walsingham, Egmere Road NR22 6BT Regular steam trains from the seaside town of Wells next the Sea to the beautiful village of Walsingham, with it's famous Abbey and shrines. Sit back and enjoy the nostalgic and atmospheric sights, sounds and smells of steam travel. Clanking over and under bridges, past a hill-fort and an abandoned platform, you get to choose between a mooch in Walsingham or the hustle and bustle of the beach and shops of Wells. Beautiful views, wildflowers, butterflies, birds of prey, brown hare and deer all help to make your journey with us a memorable one. Children's' activities during every holiday and lots of events to choose from. Free parking, wifi, toilets, cafe and gift shop, crazy croquet and picnic pods.
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The Wells & Walsingham Light Railway
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Stations at: Wells-Next-the-Sea off A149 NR23 1QB & Walsingham, Egmere Road NR22 6BT Regular steam trains from the seaside town of Wells next the Sea to the beautiful village of Walsingham, with it's famous Abbey and shrines. Sit back and enjoy the nostalgic and atmospheric sights, sounds and smells of steam travel. Clanking over and under bridges, past a hill-fort and an abandoned platform, you get to choose between a mooch in Walsingham or the hustle and bustle of the beach and shops of Wells. Beautiful views, wildflowers, butterflies, birds of prey, brown hare and deer all help to make your journey with us a memorable one. Children's' activities during every holiday and lots of events to choose from. Free parking, wifi, toilets, cafe and gift shop, crazy croquet and picnic pods.
Creake Rd, North Creake, Fakenham NR21 9LF Creake Abbey is a ruined abbey in Norfolk, England, situated alongside the River Burn and a mile to the north of the village of North Creake. The abbey church was dedicated to Saint Mary. The site was originally occupied by an almshouse for the poor and was founded by the Augustinians as a priory in the 12th century.
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Creake Abbey
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Creake Rd, North Creake, Fakenham NR21 9LF Creake Abbey is a ruined abbey in Norfolk, England, situated alongside the River Burn and a mile to the north of the village of North Creake. The abbey church was dedicated to Saint Mary. The site was originally occupied by an almshouse for the poor and was founded by the Augustinians as a priory in the 12th century.
Thursford Green, Thursford, Norfolk, NR21 0AS The Thursford Collection is open during the summer as a working museum of mechanical organs, Wurlitzer shows, silent movies, old fashioned fairground carousels, static displays of fairground & road engines & all kinds of related memorabilia.
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Thursford Collection
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Thursford Green, Thursford, Norfolk, NR21 0AS The Thursford Collection is open during the summer as a working museum of mechanical organs, Wurlitzer shows, silent movies, old fashioned fairground carousels, static displays of fairground & road engines & all kinds of related memorabilia.
Houghton, King's Lynn, Norfolk, PE31 6UE One of the finest Palladian Houses in this country. Built-in the 1720s, for Sir Robert Walpole, Britain's First Prime Minister. It is a showcase of the work of architects James Gibbs and Colen Campbell complemented by the richly ornamented interiors of William Kent and furnished to reflect Walpole's growing wealth and power. The Hall is currently the home of the 7th Marquess of Cholmondeley, Walpole's descendent, and his family. Situated in traditional parkland, Houghton is home to a spectacular herd of white fallow and other exotic deer. Displayed in the grounds is an impressive collection of contemporary sculptures by world-renowned artists including works by James Turrell, Richard Long, Stephen Cox, Anya Gallaccio, Stephen Cox, Jeppe Hein, Rachel Whiteread, Phillip King and Henry Moore. The award-winning 5-acre Walled Garden includes a spectacular double-sided herbaceous border, a formal rose parterre, a Mediterranean garden, and a kitchen garden with arches and espaliers of apples and pears. There are also glasshouses, antique statues, fountains, Stephen Cox's Flask II, Jeppe Hein's Waterflame and Sir Richard Long's Houghton Cross. The Stables contain a range of original wooden stalls and tack and harness room. There is a fully-licensed café, Gift Shop and a Soldier Museum, which holds The Cholmondeley Collection of Soldiers one of the largest private collections in the world, with 20,000 models displayed.
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Houghton Hall
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Houghton, King's Lynn, Norfolk, PE31 6UE One of the finest Palladian Houses in this country. Built-in the 1720s, for Sir Robert Walpole, Britain's First Prime Minister. It is a showcase of the work of architects James Gibbs and Colen Campbell complemented by the richly ornamented interiors of William Kent and furnished to reflect Walpole's growing wealth and power. The Hall is currently the home of the 7th Marquess of Cholmondeley, Walpole's descendent, and his family. Situated in traditional parkland, Houghton is home to a spectacular herd of white fallow and other exotic deer. Displayed in the grounds is an impressive collection of contemporary sculptures by world-renowned artists including works by James Turrell, Richard Long, Stephen Cox, Anya Gallaccio, Stephen Cox, Jeppe Hein, Rachel Whiteread, Phillip King and Henry Moore. The award-winning 5-acre Walled Garden includes a spectacular double-sided herbaceous border, a formal rose parterre, a Mediterranean garden, and a kitchen garden with arches and espaliers of apples and pears. There are also glasshouses, antique statues, fountains, Stephen Cox's Flask II, Jeppe Hein's Waterflame and Sir Richard Long's Houghton Cross. The Stables contain a range of original wooden stalls and tack and harness room. There is a fully-licensed café, Gift Shop and a Soldier Museum, which holds The Cholmondeley Collection of Soldiers one of the largest private collections in the world, with 20,000 models displayed.
Hunstanton PE36 6JJ The beach at Hunstanton is set against the famous striped cliffs, formed from a combination of Norfolk carstone and white chalk. There are many marine fossils waiting to be discovered including ammonites, bivalves, worm tubes, belemnites, corals and crustacean burrows. You may be lucky to find sharks teeth along the shoreline as well as fish skeletons! Top tips and guidance for rock pooling: Make sure you check the tidal times before you set out. Rock pooling is best at low tide. Wear sensible footwear so you don’t slip. Rock pools tend to be clearer close to the sea edge – for safety look at these first and move back with the tide. If you’re planning to take a closer look at what you catch, a bucket with some salty water is useful but make sure you change the water regularly. Don't use a net, as you can hurt sensitive sea life. When you've finished, carefully return your finds in your bucket, including the salt water, back to the rock pool.
Hunstanton Beach
Off Beach Terrace Rd
Hunstanton PE36 6JJ The beach at Hunstanton is set against the famous striped cliffs, formed from a combination of Norfolk carstone and white chalk. There are many marine fossils waiting to be discovered including ammonites, bivalves, worm tubes, belemnites, corals and crustacean burrows. You may be lucky to find sharks teeth along the shoreline as well as fish skeletons! Top tips and guidance for rock pooling: Make sure you check the tidal times before you set out. Rock pooling is best at low tide. Wear sensible footwear so you don’t slip. Rock pools tend to be clearer close to the sea edge – for safety look at these first and move back with the tide. If you’re planning to take a closer look at what you catch, a bucket with some salty water is useful but make sure you change the water regularly. Don't use a net, as you can hurt sensitive sea life. When you've finished, carefully return your finds in your bucket, including the salt water, back to the rock pool.
Cromer has an impressive pier that is 500 feet long, built by Alfred Thorne and opened in 1901. The pier was erected to replace two earlier structures that were destroyed by high seas. Cromer had several jetties but the pier that we know and love today was built almost 120 years ago. A pavilion was constructed in 1905 and to this day, the pier looks almost the same as it did when it was first built. Vital restoration work undertaken since severe damage caused by high tides in 1949 and 1953 (and more recently the winter storms of 2007 and 2013) has helped to strengthen and fortify this impressive Victorian pier for all to enjoy. The Pavilion Theatre is home to the Seaside Show and is the only ‘end of pier’ show in Europe. This wonderful variety show is on every day during the summer months and shows are available all year round. Cromer Pier was named as ‘Pier of the Year 2015’ by the National Pier Society in recognition of the grit, determination and hard work of the local people of Cromer to restore the pier to its glory. This follows the most recent heavy damage to the the pier, sustained during the storms of winter 2013/2014.
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Cromer Pier & Pavilion Theatre
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Cromer has an impressive pier that is 500 feet long, built by Alfred Thorne and opened in 1901. The pier was erected to replace two earlier structures that were destroyed by high seas. Cromer had several jetties but the pier that we know and love today was built almost 120 years ago. A pavilion was constructed in 1905 and to this day, the pier looks almost the same as it did when it was first built. Vital restoration work undertaken since severe damage caused by high tides in 1949 and 1953 (and more recently the winter storms of 2007 and 2013) has helped to strengthen and fortify this impressive Victorian pier for all to enjoy. The Pavilion Theatre is home to the Seaside Show and is the only ‘end of pier’ show in Europe. This wonderful variety show is on every day during the summer months and shows are available all year round. Cromer Pier was named as ‘Pier of the Year 2015’ by the National Pier Society in recognition of the grit, determination and hard work of the local people of Cromer to restore the pier to its glory. This follows the most recent heavy damage to the the pier, sustained during the storms of winter 2013/2014.
For those that enjoy basking in the sun Cromer has splendid sandy ‘Blue Flag’ beaches. The Blue Flag is awarded only to beaches which pass strict health and hygiene standards set by the European Commission. The east beach is patrolled from the middle of May to the middle of September. The west beach is patrolled from early July until early September. During peak times the beaches are patrolled by RNLI life guards from 10am to 6pm every day.
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Cromer Beach
41 Runton Rd
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For those that enjoy basking in the sun Cromer has splendid sandy ‘Blue Flag’ beaches. The Blue Flag is awarded only to beaches which pass strict health and hygiene standards set by the European Commission. The east beach is patrolled from the middle of May to the middle of September. The west beach is patrolled from early July until early September. During peak times the beaches are patrolled by RNLI life guards from 10am to 6pm every day.
There are many stories of the brave lifeboat men who made Cromer famous, far and wide. A bronze bust commemorating Cromer’s most famous lifeboatman, Henry Blogg (coxswain from 1909 to 1947) can be found on the cliff top in North Lodge Park. Cromer Lifeboat MuseumWith his crews of courageous men he saved 873 lives during this time, many during the Second World War. He was recognised for his bravery and awarded the George Cross, three RNLI medals and the British Empire Medal. At the bottom of the Gangway (at the end of the east promenade) you’ll find the Henry Blogg Museum which provides information and artefacts from his days, along with interesting historical facts about the role of the RNLI and its history with Cromer. The legendary HF Bailey lifeboat, Henry Blogg’s lifeboat from 1935-45 forms the centrepiece of the museum. It’s definitely worth a visit. The museum was opened in 2006 by Ronnie Corbett (who started his stage career in Cromer) and offers free admission. The Rocket House Café above the museum has a fine selection of food and beverages, along with a splendid balcony overlooking the beach. A lift provides easy access to both the museum and café, avoiding the rather steep Gangway.
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RNLI Henry Blogg Museum
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There are many stories of the brave lifeboat men who made Cromer famous, far and wide. A bronze bust commemorating Cromer’s most famous lifeboatman, Henry Blogg (coxswain from 1909 to 1947) can be found on the cliff top in North Lodge Park. Cromer Lifeboat MuseumWith his crews of courageous men he saved 873 lives during this time, many during the Second World War. He was recognised for his bravery and awarded the George Cross, three RNLI medals and the British Empire Medal. At the bottom of the Gangway (at the end of the east promenade) you’ll find the Henry Blogg Museum which provides information and artefacts from his days, along with interesting historical facts about the role of the RNLI and its history with Cromer. The legendary HF Bailey lifeboat, Henry Blogg’s lifeboat from 1935-45 forms the centrepiece of the museum. It’s definitely worth a visit. The museum was opened in 2006 by Ronnie Corbett (who started his stage career in Cromer) and offers free admission. The Rocket House Café above the museum has a fine selection of food and beverages, along with a splendid balcony overlooking the beach. A lift provides easy access to both the museum and café, avoiding the rather steep Gangway.
After a bracing seaside walk, why not step inside Cromer Museum. Have a look around the cosy Victorian fisherman’s cottage and imagine what it was like to live in Cromer at the end of the 19th Century. Delve into the ‘Old Cromer’ Gallery with its displays of historic photographs and illustrations of the town. Discover Cromer’s history as a Victorian seaside resort with its fine hotels and scandal of mixed bathing. Learn about the daring rescues of Henry Blogg and the Cromer lifeboatmen.
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Cromer Museum
4 Tucker St
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After a bracing seaside walk, why not step inside Cromer Museum. Have a look around the cosy Victorian fisherman’s cottage and imagine what it was like to live in Cromer at the end of the 19th Century. Delve into the ‘Old Cromer’ Gallery with its displays of historic photographs and illustrations of the town. Discover Cromer’s history as a Victorian seaside resort with its fine hotels and scandal of mixed bathing. Learn about the daring rescues of Henry Blogg and the Cromer lifeboatmen.
Cromer Carnival is undoubtedly the main event of the summer season for the town. Preparations are made for the event all year round with almost every business supporting the carnival. The Cromer Carnival committee work tirelessly to organise lots of events during the carnival week – usually the 3rd week in August. The highlight of the carnival is the Cromer Carnival Day (usually the Wednesday) with it’s spectacular Float Procession through the town. Crab & Lobster FestivalThis is when Cromer really comes alive with fun, live music and dancing! Additionally, in connection with the carnival, there are usually many activities for children close to the Cromer Pier for the first two weeks in August. Go to www.cromercarnival.co.uk for further details and confirmation of the carnival dates.
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Cromer
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Cromer Carnival is undoubtedly the main event of the summer season for the town. Preparations are made for the event all year round with almost every business supporting the carnival. The Cromer Carnival committee work tirelessly to organise lots of events during the carnival week – usually the 3rd week in August. The highlight of the carnival is the Cromer Carnival Day (usually the Wednesday) with it’s spectacular Float Procession through the town. Crab & Lobster FestivalThis is when Cromer really comes alive with fun, live music and dancing! Additionally, in connection with the carnival, there are usually many activities for children close to the Cromer Pier for the first two weeks in August. Go to www.cromercarnival.co.uk for further details and confirmation of the carnival dates.
Golf clubs
Sweetbriar Ln, Sheringham NR26 8HG Sheringham Golf Club is a golf club on the western outskirts of Sheringham, Norfolk, England. The 6546-yard links course was originally designed by Tom Dunn and opened in 1891. The Links Hotel lies a few miles east of the course
Sheringham Golf Club
Sweetbriar Ln, Sheringham NR26 8HG Sheringham Golf Club is a golf club on the western outskirts of Sheringham, Norfolk, England. The 6546-yard links course was originally designed by Tom Dunn and opened in 1891. The Links Hotel lies a few miles east of the course
Beach Rd, Brancaster, King's Lynn PE31 8AX Royal West Norfolk Golf Club is a golf club in Brancaster, Norfolk, England, about 7 miles east of Hunstanton, between Brancaster Bay and the salt marshes. The links course opened in 1892. Simon Rayner is a professional at the club.
Royal West Norfolk Golf Club
Beach Rd, Brancaster, King's Lynn PE31 8AX Royal West Norfolk Golf Club is a golf club in Brancaster, Norfolk, England, about 7 miles east of Hunstanton, between Brancaster Bay and the salt marshes. The links course opened in 1892. Simon Rayner is a professional at the club.
Hunstanton Rd, Heacham, Nr Hunstanton PE31 7JX North West Norfolk's only hotel with 18 hole golf course, praised as “Norfolk's most exciting new club” by Club Golfer Magazine. Perfect Stay and Play Breaks.
Heacham Manor Golf Club
Hunstanton Rd, Heacham, Nr Hunstanton PE31 7JX North West Norfolk's only hotel with 18 hole golf course, praised as “Norfolk's most exciting new club” by Club Golfer Magazine. Perfect Stay and Play Breaks.
Golf Course Rd, Hunstanton, Norfolk PE36 6JQ Hunstanton Golf Club is an 18-hole member's golf club in Norfolk, England which has hosted many of the leading amateur golf tournaments in Britain including the Brabazon Trophy and English Amateur.
Hunstanton Golf Club
Golf Course Rd, Hunstanton, Norfolk PE36 6JQ Hunstanton Golf Club is an 18-hole member's golf club in Norfolk, England which has hosted many of the leading amateur golf tournaments in Britain including the Brabazon Trophy and English Amateur.
145 Overstrand Rd, Cromer NR27 0JH Our North Norfolk course was originally designed by Tom Morris and sits proudly as one of the best cliff-top courses in England. It features spectacular views and boasts all the attributes of a coastal course with a wealth of sandy hills, grassy valleys and abundant gorse and bracken.
Royal Cromer Golf Club
145 Overstrand Rd
145 Overstrand Rd, Cromer NR27 0JH Our North Norfolk course was originally designed by Tom Morris and sits proudly as one of the best cliff-top courses in England. It features spectacular views and boasts all the attributes of a coastal course with a wealth of sandy hills, grassy valleys and abundant gorse and bracken.
Cycling
The landscape of north Norfolk seems made for cycling. It's not hilly and easily managed even by occasional cyclists. Yet it rolls enough to be interesting, and from the saddle, you can go at your own speed and savour the distinctive character of the area - its flint walls, red-tiled roofs, birdlife, majestic medieval churches, cosy pubs, grand country estates and wonderful tranquillity. And you're nearly always aware that the sea is not that far away.
The Peddars Way, Magazine Wood is located on Peddars Way and you are permitted to cycle nearly all 93 miles of it! you can cycle right to the sea and explore this wonderful coastline some unmade tracks (that can be muddy) will take you past beautiful woodlands and historic estates.
Peddars Way
The Peddars Way, Magazine Wood is located on Peddars Way and you are permitted to cycle nearly all 93 miles of it! you can cycle right to the sea and explore this wonderful coastline some unmade tracks (that can be muddy) will take you past beautiful woodlands and historic estates.
Sandringham Much of the estate of the Queen's Norfolk residence is designated as Sandringham Country Park, open free all year, an area of 250 hectares of carefully managed woodland and heath. It has two nature trails.
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Sandringham House
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Sandringham Much of the estate of the Queen's Norfolk residence is designated as Sandringham Country Park, open free all year, an area of 250 hectares of carefully managed woodland and heath. It has two nature trails.
Norfolk Coast Cycleway
Along The Norfolk Coast Cycleway, A series of signposted routes make it sheer pleasure crossing through delectable Norfolk countryside. on very clear maps it consists of the Norfolk Coast Cycleway itself, a single 92mile route parallel to the coast, and ten Explorer Loops which are circular tours you can do within a  day. Many accommodation hosts - from family holiday parks to luxurious B&Bs - welcome cyclists, providing cycle storage and drying areas, and some are even linked to cycle hire operations. The Norfolk Coast Cycleway takes you along idyllically peaceful back roads and country lanes parallel to the Norfolk Coast, all the way from King's Lynn to Cromer (59 ½ miles), and then Cromer to Great Yarmouth (42 ½ miles). It's signposted all the way: from King's Lynn to Wighton (just southeast of Wells-next- Sea) it follows National Cycle Network Route 1 from Wighton to Great Yarmouth it follows Regional Route 30 (white 30 on a blue square). Specially routed to keep you off the rat  runs and take you past dozens of historic sights, country churches, village pubs and viewpoints, it can be done on a touring or mountain bike (one or two offroad sections have alternatives along roads). To return, you can take your bike on the train from Great Yarmouth to Sheringham or King's Lynn: the Anglia Plus ticket makes a great value way of getting around (see back page). The Explorer Loops link with or partly follow the Cycleway.                                                                                                 Local explorer loops include: Ingoldisthorpe Explorer Loop 18 miles                   Sandringham Explorer Loop 22 miles                                                            Ringstead Explorer Loop 23 miles                                                                  Docking Explorer Loop 32 miles                                                                    Walsingham & Wells Explorer Loop 40 miles                                             Holt Explorer Loop 24 miles
Norfolk
Along The Norfolk Coast Cycleway, A series of signposted routes make it sheer pleasure crossing through delectable Norfolk countryside. on very clear maps it consists of the Norfolk Coast Cycleway itself, a single 92mile route parallel to the coast, and ten Explorer Loops which are circular tours you can do within a  day. Many accommodation hosts - from family holiday parks to luxurious B&Bs - welcome cyclists, providing cycle storage and drying areas, and some are even linked to cycle hire operations. The Norfolk Coast Cycleway takes you along idyllically peaceful back roads and country lanes parallel to the Norfolk Coast, all the way from King's Lynn to Cromer (59 ½ miles), and then Cromer to Great Yarmouth (42 ½ miles). It's signposted all the way: from King's Lynn to Wighton (just southeast of Wells-next- Sea) it follows National Cycle Network Route 1 from Wighton to Great Yarmouth it follows Regional Route 30 (white 30 on a blue square). Specially routed to keep you off the rat  runs and take you past dozens of historic sights, country churches, village pubs and viewpoints, it can be done on a touring or mountain bike (one or two offroad sections have alternatives along roads). To return, you can take your bike on the train from Great Yarmouth to Sheringham or King's Lynn: the Anglia Plus ticket makes a great value way of getting around (see back page). The Explorer Loops link with or partly follow the Cycleway.                                                                                                 Local explorer loops include: Ingoldisthorpe Explorer Loop 18 miles                   Sandringham Explorer Loop 22 miles                                                            Ringstead Explorer Loop 23 miles                                                                  Docking Explorer Loop 32 miles                                                                    Walsingham & Wells Explorer Loop 40 miles                                             Holt Explorer Loop 24 miles
Birdwatching
Bird watching in North West Norfolk Whilst we are not avid bird watchers, we still stand spellbound witnessing literally thousands of migratory pink-footed geese blacken the skies over Magazine Wood as they honk their way at dusk to their night time roost at Snettisham reserve. Little wonder, many describe this corner of Norfolk as the bird watching capital of Britain. There's plenty to see whatever the time of year - from Barn Owls to Kingfishers, Cetti's Warbler to Bearded Tits. For many Norfolk is a birdwatchers' favourite especially for novices with visitor centres and nature reserves, that help the beginner and inform the experienced. A keen local birdwatcher advises: Birdwatching in Spring If you come to Norfolk in April or May you'll enjoy the peak months for spring bird migration. Listen to nightingales or watch the sky-dancing display of marsh harriers and nesting avocets on the North Norfolk coast. You may also spot the rare nesting stone curlews in the rabbit-nibbled heaths or Little Ringed Plover, Redshank, Lapwing and Sandmartins arriving at Pensthorpe. Birdwatching in Summer Head for the coast to watch marsh harriers, bearded tits, avocets, terns and maybe a bittern. It's also a good time to take a boat trip to see the seals or the various wildlife at RSPB Strumpshaw Fen as well as swallowtail butterflies and Norfolk Hawker dragonflies. At Pensthorpe (20 mins) and you will see Raptors, along with Kestrals and Sparrowhawks. Also, keep your eyes peeled for buzzards at Great Ryburgh (15 mins dt) and your ears open for nightjars. Birdwatching in Autumn Autumn starts early in the birdwatching world. Even by July you'll find the first returning waders, many still in their breeding plumage, appearing on the marshes. By August, the southbound waders will be at RSPB Titchwell (10 mins dt), NWT Cley and RSPB Snettisham (5 mins dt) and in early autumn you may delight in discovering a rare red backed shrike or barred warbler. A little later on you may be rewarded by spotting a yellow browed or Pallas's warbler or even something rarer! But with all this taking place along the coast and on the marshes, don't forget that at inland reserves like Pensthorpe, it's a good time to spot Woodpeckers, Grey partridge, the Kingfisher, Barn and Tawny Owls. Birdwatching in Winter This is the season to visit if you're a serious twitcher. Come in late October to see the arrival of flocks of winter thrushes from across the north sea and the return of the wild geese and swans. The Wash is England's largest tidal estuary and one of the country's most important winter feeding areas for waders and wildfowl. The RSPB at Snettisham is a fantastic place to witness the spectacular movement of of wading birds pushed off their feeding grounds at high tide. The Norfolk coast is a great place for waders and wintering birds of prey, including merlin, peregrine and hen harrier, and you can see them best at dusk at places such as RSPB Titchwell Marsh. The Norfolk countryside is also blessed with migratory visitors. At the reserve at Pensthorpe, it's a good time to see many native species of waterfowl including Golden Eye, Gadwell, Goosander, Shoveller and Pintail. It's a great opportunity to see Europe's smallest duck, the European Teal and you may even catch a glimpse of one of the UK's most endangered owl, the Long Eared Owl, as they come together in Winter for communal roosts. Don't forget to pack your binoculars! A word from an expert Neil Glenn, author of "Best Birdwatching Sites in Norfolk" says "Norfolk is rightly regarded by birdwatchers as the best county to visit in Britain to see birds. The real beauty of Norfolk is that there is a mouth-watering variety of bird species to admire, no matter what time of year you choose to come. From the spectacle of thousands of Geese in winter, the wonder of migrating species in spring and autumn to the array of breeding Waders and Warblers, you are guaranteed to see something special during your time in this very special county.”
Norfolk
Bird watching in North West Norfolk Whilst we are not avid bird watchers, we still stand spellbound witnessing literally thousands of migratory pink-footed geese blacken the skies over Magazine Wood as they honk their way at dusk to their night time roost at Snettisham reserve. Little wonder, many describe this corner of Norfolk as the bird watching capital of Britain. There's plenty to see whatever the time of year - from Barn Owls to Kingfishers, Cetti's Warbler to Bearded Tits. For many Norfolk is a birdwatchers' favourite especially for novices with visitor centres and nature reserves, that help the beginner and inform the experienced. A keen local birdwatcher advises: Birdwatching in Spring If you come to Norfolk in April or May you'll enjoy the peak months for spring bird migration. Listen to nightingales or watch the sky-dancing display of marsh harriers and nesting avocets on the North Norfolk coast. You may also spot the rare nesting stone curlews in the rabbit-nibbled heaths or Little Ringed Plover, Redshank, Lapwing and Sandmartins arriving at Pensthorpe. Birdwatching in Summer Head for the coast to watch marsh harriers, bearded tits, avocets, terns and maybe a bittern. It's also a good time to take a boat trip to see the seals or the various wildlife at RSPB Strumpshaw Fen as well as swallowtail butterflies and Norfolk Hawker dragonflies. At Pensthorpe (20 mins) and you will see Raptors, along with Kestrals and Sparrowhawks. Also, keep your eyes peeled for buzzards at Great Ryburgh (15 mins dt) and your ears open for nightjars. Birdwatching in Autumn Autumn starts early in the birdwatching world. Even by July you'll find the first returning waders, many still in their breeding plumage, appearing on the marshes. By August, the southbound waders will be at RSPB Titchwell (10 mins dt), NWT Cley and RSPB Snettisham (5 mins dt) and in early autumn you may delight in discovering a rare red backed shrike or barred warbler. A little later on you may be rewarded by spotting a yellow browed or Pallas's warbler or even something rarer! But with all this taking place along the coast and on the marshes, don't forget that at inland reserves like Pensthorpe, it's a good time to spot Woodpeckers, Grey partridge, the Kingfisher, Barn and Tawny Owls. Birdwatching in Winter This is the season to visit if you're a serious twitcher. Come in late October to see the arrival of flocks of winter thrushes from across the north sea and the return of the wild geese and swans. The Wash is England's largest tidal estuary and one of the country's most important winter feeding areas for waders and wildfowl. The RSPB at Snettisham is a fantastic place to witness the spectacular movement of of wading birds pushed off their feeding grounds at high tide. The Norfolk coast is a great place for waders and wintering birds of prey, including merlin, peregrine and hen harrier, and you can see them best at dusk at places such as RSPB Titchwell Marsh. The Norfolk countryside is also blessed with migratory visitors. At the reserve at Pensthorpe, it's a good time to see many native species of waterfowl including Golden Eye, Gadwell, Goosander, Shoveller and Pintail. It's a great opportunity to see Europe's smallest duck, the European Teal and you may even catch a glimpse of one of the UK's most endangered owl, the Long Eared Owl, as they come together in Winter for communal roosts. Don't forget to pack your binoculars! A word from an expert Neil Glenn, author of "Best Birdwatching Sites in Norfolk" says "Norfolk is rightly regarded by birdwatchers as the best county to visit in Britain to see birds. The real beauty of Norfolk is that there is a mouth-watering variety of bird species to admire, no matter what time of year you choose to come. From the spectacle of thousands of Geese in winter, the wonder of migrating species in spring and autumn to the array of breeding Waders and Warblers, you are guaranteed to see something special during your time in this very special county.”