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Principais recomendações de bares dos moradores locais

Pub
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“Check out the flea market outside the Magdalen Arms pub on Iffley Road - it takes place on the first Saturday of each month (except some winter months) from 9.30am until lunchtime. There are interesting objects for sale and details can be found on the pub website. ”
  • 48 moradores locais recomendam
Bar
“The Rusty Bicycle is our favourite local pub. It does good food during the day and is open late at weekends. The home-made burgers, pizzas and ales are great. It is also on Magdalen Rd. ”
  • 47 moradores locais recomendam
Restaurante de Tapas
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“A friendly smile, beautifully hand made food, and delicious cocktails are waiting for you at Oxford’s best tapas bar. So come on in, sit back, and soak up the atmosphere. We will be here waiting to make you a drink.”
  • 35 moradores locais recomendam
Pub
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“The Turf Tavern (or just "the Turf") is a popular but well-hidden historic pub in central Oxford, England. Its foundations and use as a malt house and drinking tavern date back to 1381. The low-beamed front bar area was put in place sometime in the 17th century. It was originally called the Spotted Cow but the name was changed in 1842, likely as part of an effort to extinguish its reputation as a venue for illegal gambling activities. The pub is frequented primarily by university students (of both Oxford University and Oxford Brookes University). It is located at the end of a narrow winding alley, St Helens Passage (originally Hell's passage), between Holywell Street and New College Lane, near the Bridge of Sighs. Running along one side of the pub is one of the remaining sections of the old city wall. Due to the illegal activities of many of its original patrons, the Turf sprang up in an area just outside the city wall in order to escape the jurisdiction of the governing bodies of the local colleges. The Turf Tavern is also where former Australian Prime Minister Bob Hawke set a Guinness World Record for consuming a yard glass of ale in 11 seconds in 1963. Local legend also has it that former U.S. president Bill Clinton, while attending Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, infamously "did not inhale" during an evening of carousing at the pub. Additional celebrities and public figures who have dined or drunk at the tavern include Richard Burton, Elizabeth Taylor, Tony Blair, CS Lewis, Stephen Hawking and Margaret Thatcher. It also served as a hangout for the cast and crew of the Harry Potter movies while the nearby colleges were used as locations throughout the filming of the series. It was also featured in the show Inspector Morse. The pub inspired The Lamb and Flag, a fictional drinking establishment featured in Jude the Obscure, author Thomas Hardy's final novel. It is also reportedly haunted by "Old Rosie," the ghost of a young woman who allegedly drowned herself in a nearby moat after her lover failed to return from the English Civil War. The Turf is still a frequent gathering place for the Rhodes community in Oxford as the site of Turf Tuesday every week during term.”
  • 27 moradores locais recomendam
Pub
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“The Isis Farmhouse is a riverside music pub on the Thames towpath near Iffley, only accessible by foot or boat. Very popular in summer for its large, tree-shaded, family-friendly beer garden by the river and as a year-round venue for trad jazz, folk, country and world music. ”
  • 42 moradores locais recomendam
Boate
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“The reason for visiting this bar is for its unique original Oxford terrace where you can sit and have a drink amongst the Dreaming Spires. ”
  • 24 moradores locais recomendam
Bar
“Great food and great location being on Port Meadow with its towers and boating plus lovely riverside walks ”
  • 30 moradores locais recomendam
Bar de Coquetéis
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“RAOUL'S HAS BEEN A COCKTAIL INSTITUTION SINCE 1979 BUT BY 1999 WAS LOOKING VERY TIRED INDEED. AFTER A MAJOR REFURB RAOUL'S WAS REBORN INTO A GREAT LITTLE COCKTAIL BAR AND SINCE THEN HAS WON A MULTITUDE OF AWARDS, EVEN BEING PLACED AS ONE OF THE TOP 50 BARS IN THE WORLD BY THE SUNDAY TIMES”
  • 21 moradores locais recomendam
Restaurante
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“Gee’s Restaurant offers locals and visitors a uniquely rustic, Mediterranean dining experience set in an iconic Victorian Glasshouse…Enjoy a house cocktail at the marble topped bar, dine in the light-filled conservatory amidst olive trees and plants, choose from a daily evolving seasonal menu inspired by the regional dishes of Spain and Italy, cooked on the wood fire oven and charcoal grill…”
  • 19 moradores locais recomendam
Bar
“An exceptional menu; this is not your typical gastro-pub fare. The food is inspirationally modern British and multi-award winning. The kitchen delivers an exciting take on English classics and everything is produced from scratch on site by their team of talented chefs. The emphasis is on celebrating local produce sourced in and around Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire.”
  • 23 moradores locais recomendam
Pub
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“This is a lovely little chilled out pub with the best steak platter in the world. It is a sharing plate but boy is it delicious, I'm salivating just thinking about it. They don't do them every day so call to check before going there. ”
  • 20 moradores locais recomendam
Pub
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“The Bear Inn (or just "The Bear") is one of the oldest pubs in Oxford, England, dating back to 1242. Its circa-17th century incarnation stands on the corner of Alfred Street and Blue Boar Street, opposite Bear Lane in the centre of Oxford, just north of Christ Church. The earliest mention of the lands and buildings subsequently occupied by The Bear Inn are found in the Cartularies of St Frideswide. Christina Pady, who was part of the ruling group of burgess families in Oxford at this time, is recorded as having inherited these properties from her late husband, Laurence Kepeharme, the first Mayor of Oxford (died circa 1209) and from her uncle, John Pady. She bequeathed in frankalmoin the land comprising two properties Parn Hall (Pirnehalle) at the western corner of High Street and Alfred Street and another to the south, on the corner of Alfred Street and Blue Boar Street, to the Priory of St Frideswide, which stood on the current site of Christ Church Cathedral. This bequest was made around 1220 to 1230, and was completed on 28 April 1241. A lease dating from 1523 states that the Bear was bounded on the south by the cemetery of St Edward's Church, which lay beyond St Edward's Street (now Blue Boar Lane). It is thought that the two properties bequeathed by Christina Pady were joined and formed the yard of what became the Inn. The next mention is in the tenancy agreement of Thomas Pope in 1277, who with his wife and son were assured tenancy for the rest of their lives for a sum of two marks per year, with a deposit of 30 marks. The original building burnt down in 1421. In 1432, the inn was leased to John and Joan Berford, at which time it was known as Le Tabard. It was known as The Bear Inn by 1457, and a transfer of tenancy from Robert Mychegood to Henry Stanley took place in 1522. It was temporarily known as Furres Inn at some point. A margin note in Anthony Wood's Survey of the Antiquities of the City of Oxford (1661-66) states that the Furreses lived at the Bear in the time of Henry VIII (i.e in the first half of the 16th Century). The main text states that the inn came, under the name of The Bear Inne into the possession of brothers Richard and Roger Taverner following the dissolution of St Frideswide's Priory. Richard Edes, later Dean of Worcester, records the proprietor of The Bear in 1583 as a Matthew Harrison, who had a pet bear named Furze. An alternative explanation is that it adopted the emblem of the bear and ragged staff on the crest of Richard Neville, the Earl of Warwick. It was especially fashionable in the 17th century, when judges and royal commissioners were among the patrons. The heir to the throne in Denmark visited in 1652. When it closed in 1801, there were over thirty bedrooms, with stabling for a similar number of horses. In the 18th century, the Bear served as the depot for the Oxford Machine coach, which carried passengers to London for a fare of 10 shillings. The present building was built in the early 17th century as the residence of the coaching inn's ostler. It was converted into a separate tavern, The Jolly Trooper, in 1774. The Bear Inn's premises at the High Street was rebuilt and converted into private housing in 1801 and its business name transferred to the former Jolly Trooper.”
  • 23 moradores locais recomendam
Steakhouse
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“Nestled on the High Street in Oxford, this is one of my favourite places to eat. Formerly was the ‘Old Bank’. Either serving breakfast, lunch and dinner . Ideal if you are sightseeing in Oxford and want to have a nice lunch or whatever you fancy.”
  • 15 moradores locais recomendam
Bar
“Craft beers plus gastro-fare in rustic-chic inn with scrubbed-wood tables and vintage ephemera. ”
  • 12 moradores locais recomendam
Pub
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“Atmospheric Cotswold pub and restaurant serving up fine food. Recently taken over by the Lucky Onion group, the place retains it's cosy feel and has space for larger groups. Booking essential at weekends. For more informal dining food can be ordered in the bar area.”
  • 15 moradores locais recomendam
Pub
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“The King's Head Inn is one of our favourite pubs in the area for a quiet drink or lunch or dinner. The food is great, as is the location on the green in Bledington. Look out for the Bantam chickens in the garden!”
  • 19 moradores locais recomendam